Película del "SUICIDE SQUAD" (2016) - "THE SUICIDE SQUAD "

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- Nuevos detalles de los personajes del ‘Suicide Squad’:
Durante la visita al set de la película, se revelaron nuevos detalles sobre cada uno de los personajes del "Suicide Squad" incluñidas sus historias pasadas, sus trajes y sus historias durante la película:

Amanda Waller (Viola Davis): La mente maestra

Es un agente del gobierno. No es técnicamente una villana, pero no es tampoco ninguna noble heroína. El productor Andy Horowitz la describe como “uno de los personajes más escalofriantes de la película”, mientras que Richard Suckle la llamá más escuetamente, “La mejor manera que puedo decirlo, es que es tan sólo una mala hija de p***”. Pero también tiene un punto de vista muy distinto y lo hace porque, en su mente, es la razón correcta. No la fastidias porque las consecuencias son peores de lo que ella te está pidiendo que hagas.


Rick Flag (Joel Kinnaman): El líder

Rick Flag es otro de los personajes que no es realmente un villano. David Ayer lo describe como, “un oficial militar de primera”. Pero tiene algo en común con otros miembros del Squad, y es que no quiere estar realmente allí. Como Suckle explica "[Flag] trabaja para Amanda Waller,lo que significa que tiene que hacer lo que sea que Amanda Waller diga. No es necesariamente una tarea de nivel A en la superficie, pero está haciendo de padre para la clase de payasos y niños rebeldes, y Joel lo hace bellísimamente. […] Tiene que ser capaz de manejar todas estas relaciones y personalidades, y sus energías y actitudes de forma que al final consiga que se haga el trabajo, lo que hace muy difícil su trabajo".

Para prepararlo para el papel, Ayer le dio material para leer como las mamorias del Delta Force Charlie Beckwith y le hizo trabajar con miembros reales del ejército. “[Kinnaman] hico mucho entrenamiento. Realmente lo hizo,” dice Horowitz. “Tuvimos Navy SEALs reales que están en la película también, que trabajaron con Joel e hizo una inmersión completa durante unas cuantas noches en mitad de ninguna parte y durmió al aire libre, y no durmió, y se entrenó todos los días.”


Katana (Karen Fukuhara): La protectora

Fortunately, Rick Flag isn’t all alone with these nutjobs. He’s got Katana in his corner. The character was an unexpected addition to the Suicide Squad cast, since she doesn’t really roll with that crowd in the comics. But here, she’s Rick Flag’s protector. And according to Karen Fukuhara, that may make Katana the deadliest Squad member of all:

"[Katana is] not into fighting for herself, that’s the giri-ninjo part. It’s for someone else. And when someone doesn’t care about her own well-being, to kill someone else and to protect someone, that makes her the scariest one. Try fighting someone that doesn’t care about what the outcome is for them, you know? You’re going against someone who’s going to give it their all no matter how many times you shoot at them. That’s why she’s so badass".

Despite her loyalty to Rick, Fukuhara describes her character as a lone wolf who’s “not so friendly” with the other Squad members. There’s a lot of pain in her backstory, as evidenced by the fact that her weapon of choice is Soultaker — a sword that has her dead husband’s spirit trapped within.

Katana is one of the few Suicide Squad cast members who looks more or less like her ink-and-paper counterpart, so it’s not surprising to hear Fukuhara dug deep into comics like Katana and Birds of Prey for research. Going outside the DC universe, Fukuhara also referenced Rurouni Kenshin, Mikasa in Attack on Titan, and Ken Watanabe in The Last Samurai as inspirations.


Deadshot (Will Smith): The Other Leader

Now let’s get into more straightforwardly villainous territory. “Deadshot is a no-brainer because he’s just a core element of that team,” Ayer said of the character’s inclusion in the movie. Deadshot, a.k.a. Floyd Lawton, is the head of the team along with Rick Flag. Well, sort of. “It’s like herding cats. They don’t care,” said Ayer of the Squad’s reaction to their ostensible leader.

Will Smith has spent most of his career playing good, likable men, which had us wondering if his version of Deadshot would be more of an antihero. But no, Ayer said, he’s “probably a supervillain.”

He’s a bad guy. They are all bad guys. That’s the beauty of this. That’s the fun of the genre. I think Will is incredibly versatile and can handle any kind of role you throw at him.

Horowitz described Smith’s Deadshot as “kind of a combination of I think some old school Deadshot and the New 52 version of Deadshot,” with elements of antihero and supervillain. Deadshot’s costume, as we’ve already seen, is fairly accurate to the comics — although in typical Suicide Squad fashion it’s decorated with words like “I am the light, the way.” “It’s [Deadshot’s] saying, it’s written on obviously his wrist magnums and his gun and it’s written around his collar as well,” said Horowitz.

Boomerang (Jai Courtney): The Class Clown

The Boomerang identity has been used by a couple different characters in the comics, so if you’ve been wondering which one Jai Courtney is playing in Suicide Squad the answer is both, and neither. “I think it is somewhat of an amalgamation, I think is probably the fairest thing to say,” the actor told us.

What is clear is that this Boomerang brings some chaos and comedy into the mix. “It is a lot of fun to see Boomerang, who is sort of the most villainous of all these characters,” teased Ayer. “This has been a blast creating this absolutely out-of-control, force-of-nature with Jai. In character paradigms, he’s evil-chaotic.” And with his drone boomerang, this baddie has the potential to wreak a lot of havoc.

“I definitely pick up the kind of class clown slack at times,” Courtney said of his character. “Harley has this great line where she says, ‘Your village in Australia is missing its idiot. You should call home.’ Which is a great line and rings true.”

Producers Suckle and Horowitz told us Boomerang’s jokester personality wasn’t too far from Courtney’s in real life, and the actor agreed. “It’s funny because I do feel closer to this than anything else I’ve done from a performance perspective,” he said. “But its actually closer to myself than any other role I’ve ever played.”

How’s that? “Because I’m a bogan piece of shit.”


Killer Croc (Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje): The Loner

“I think Killer Croc is one of the characters that most people are really exited for,” Horowitz told us. “He’s obviously a classic Batman villain, and for us I think when approaching the character, I think the first thing that David said we all agreed is we’re not having a full CG character in this movie.” Yup, that’s right. All those scales are the result of hours in the makeup chair, not CG wizardry.

Despite his animalistic appearance — the result of a progressive disease — Killer Croc has a human soul, and it was important to Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje to make that shine through. “He’s not a crocodile, he’s a man,” he said, who “just wants to be loved.”

There’s some beautiful moments in the movie: tender moments, and unpredictable moments, and gentle moments, humorous moments. And those are all whispers of who he was as Waylon Jones. But certainly the pain and the loneliness, you can see it in his eyes. There’s decisions that he has to make along the journey whether he’s going to continue that solo, lonesome thing, or is he going to find a family? It’s a big moment for him.

But this self-described loner isn’t just moping around at home. He may live down in the sewers, but “he’s owning that world,” said Akinnuoye-Agbaje. And he’s legitimately dangerous. Killer Croc eats human flesh, and so Akinnuoye-Agbaje researched cannibalism and alligator movements for the role. “[The Squad] always have to be wary and be aware of the fact that, at any moment, he might get the hunger and just take an arm off,” he said.


El Diablo (Jay Hernandez): The Firepower

Jay Hernandez booked the role of penitent pyrokinetic Chato Santana in Suicide Squad after losing out on a different David Ayer film — he’d been one of the finalists for the Michael Peña role in End of Watch. The character in the comics is a gangster, and so Ayer and his team looked to real East L.A. gangs for insight. Everything from the character’s jacket design to his tattoos (like one that reads “213,” for the East L.A. area code) was based on that research. “[Ayer] had a very particular thing, he wanted that to be very real,” said costume designer Kate Hawley.


Slipknot (Adam Beach): The Mystery

The Suicide Squad teammate we heard least about was Slipknot, the resident knot expert. If I had to guess, he’ll probably be the character who’s offed early on. Notably, he was the one confirmed member of the Suicide Squad who was not present in the scene we saw being shot, which takes place about a third of the way through the movie. Horowitz described him as a “very cool character,” but also a “mysterious one.”


Enchantress (Cara Delevingne): The Witch

Enchantress is really two different characters, regular person June Moone and the powerful sorcerer known as Enchantress. It does not appear she’s part of the Suicide Squad, and it seems possible she’ll even turn out to be the main villain. But whatever her role in the movie turns out to be, one thing is clear: this Enchantress does not look like the one from the comics. Horowitz said that came from their efforts to modernize her:

At the end of the day she’s a witch, and I think, what would a contemporary modern-day witch look like? And so, for us I think trying to take her old look, which of course is closer to right here, and contemporize it and make it a little bit darker and a little more witchlike, I think, a little more grounded, a little more Goth. So this is what we came up with.

Though the DC cinematic universe has yet to really introduce any magical elements, they’re going all in with the supernatural with Enchantress. Hawley spilled that the character has an “occult” sensibility, with a bit of Hieronymus Bosch-style surrealism, and that she gets some “very scary” moments.


Harley Quinn (Margot Robbie): The Superstar

All of the Suicide Squad team members have their fans, but the only one who’s really a household name is Harley Quinn. Which is why it’s a little surprising it’s taken so long to bring her into live-action movies. But for Robbie, that may be a blessing:

I’m fortunate to be the first to do it because no one has set the bar remarkably high like they have with Joker, for example. So in that sense it is easier but I’m accurately aware of the fact that there is a massive fan base and I don’t want to disappoint anyone. So it’s terrifying, but like I said, it’s nice to be the first one to do it.

Ayer also sounded thrilled to be the guy who finally gets to put Harley Quinn on the big screen:

She’s freaking cool. She represents so many dichotomies in today’s world where everything is so sensitive and you can’t talk about anything or represent anything and you can’t do anything. She doesn’t care. She transcends everything. That’s what is so fascinating about her. She’s so many things, and such a powerful woman who is living life on her own terms and so honestly in the moment. And, a person who has an incredible joy in the moment. It’s great to be able to work with that character. Margot is kicking her out of the park.

Not surprisingly, Harley Quinn is one of the characters who gets a lot of backstory in the movie, especially as it pertains to Joker. That includes the the “chemical wedding” that cemented their bond and permanently turned Harleen Quinzel into Harley Quinn. “They’re almost like two alpha males, you know?” said Hawley. “They’re like Natural Born Killers, they’re like Sid and Nancy. In this world they’re like Punch and Judy, you know, there’s a very physical element to them.”

By now, we’re already well aware that the Suicide Squad version of Harley Quinn looks very different from the earlier versions — she doesn’t have her signature jester costume, for one thing. Hawley revealed that although they’d tested the costume, they ultimately went in a different direction. But keep your eye out for a little Easter egg. According to Hawley, there’s a moment in the film that winks at Harley Quinn’s other outfits:

There’s a wonderful scene in the film where […] they get given their mission outfits out of Belle Reve en route to this mission they’re on. And there’s a delightful scene, they’re all putting on their “murdering suits” as they call them, because when they put them on, people die. And Harley’s sitting there and you’ll see a moment where she’s pulling out all her corsets, so we quote every comic variation of her. It’s her dress-up box. I’m sure that Jester suit’s gonna come into it because none of us can leave it alone.


Joker (Jared Leto): The King

Similarly, it is no secret that Leto’s Joker (who is not part of the Suicide Squad) is not much like the last iconic big-screen version played by Heath Ledger. Ayer acknowledged that creating a new Joker was a challenge, but predicted Leto’s version would be “nothing short of a revelation.”

You want to talk about the third rail of comic book movies. When you have someone as talented as Jared – and then I think when you accept that Heath happened and The Dark Knight happened – you just move forward. We’re the oldest, most well-known villains in modern culture. To leave him fallow, I think would be a shame. We instantly know who he is. We know how he makes us feel. We know how he’s going to behave. Just one little drawn picture of him, and a character that fantastically iconic and powerful, almost emerges by itself. Once you start touching that character and playing with that character, he really does reveal himself in a lot of ways.

In contrast to the ragged version we saw in The Dark Knight, Suicide Squad’s Joker will be slicker, more glamorous, more business-oriented. As Suckle described him:

He’s a business man. He’s crazy of course, and he kills people, but he’s super right. He’s running a business. If you could imagine the head of any successful corporation, he runs his business that way. He just happens to be a psychopath. He’s very, very conscientious of his business and he’s also very conscientious of the way he dresses. Style is a really big part of this Joker. It would be important to him to know what next year’s Prada would be like because he may want to have it a year before everybody else. He sets trends and that’s a really cool character and I really think you haven’t seen the version of this Joker ever before, and of course there have been great people and great versions of the character.

To that end, Ayer and Hawley looked to Mexican drug cartel leaders, mimicking their ostentatious glamour and bling-heavy style, and put the character in Yves Saint Laruent-style suits with bare feet. Hawley cited Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns and Brian Azzarello and Lee Bermejo’s Joker as references for the look of Leto’s Joker.

Another signature of Leto’s Joker is his giant ring, almost like a papal ring, that he makes people kiss. And then, of course, there are those tattoos. Joker isn’t the only Suicide Squad character to sport them, but his got extra attention after that first still of the Joker was released. Suckle revealed that a Toronto artist named Rob Coutts was the one who’d designed all the characters’ tattoos.

Finally, we can’t talk about Leto’s Joker without mentioning Leto’s Method Joker antics. The actor reportedly stayed in character the whole time, even when he was in his trailer or sending emails, and largely isolated himself from the rest of the cast and crew. “When Jared came we had to defer to him as Mister J or Mister Smiley,” Hawley told us. But Robbie assured us Leto hadn’t completely given himself over to the DC madman:

Yeah, he’s kind of terrifying. He’s really lovely, though. He’s very conscientious on set. He’s not completely lost in the character that he’s violent or anything. Between every take he asks if I’m okay, blah, blah, blah. So when I first heard that he was Method, and that we couldn’t refer to him as Jared and things like that, I started to panic a bit because I’m in an abusive relationship with this guy who thinks he is the character. I was worried I’d get beat up on set. But he’s respectful, professional, and lovely. It is so incredible to watch him work because it is a really bizarre process and kind of fascinating. It’s not a process that would work for me but I can see the way he does it and it clearly works for him. It’s cool.




http://www.slashfilm.com/suicide-squad- ... r-details/


- Suicide Squad: Orígenes de los personajes y roles en el equipo explicados (screenrant):
Suicide Squad: Orígenes de los personajes y roles en el equipo explicados
Por Andrew Dyce 11 Julio 2016


Superheroes have their uses. And considering how much society loves to idolize those above them, it’s no surprise that the plucky heroes and courageous, untarnished Boy Scouts tend to get all the praise. But when evil, real evil shows up to start ruining everyone’s fun… well, in the words of a great writer, protecting the sheep means catching the wolf – and “it takes a wolf to catch a wolf.” That great writer is David Ayer, who’s out to prove the idea in the big screen take on DC’s Suicide Squad.

Now, it’s one thing to say that you’re gathering together a handful of villains, killers, and criminals to catch a more dangerous or ruthless enemy. But to actually tell that story, the cast assembled has to be more than just ‘bad,’ otherwise the idea of one villain beating the other can only carry the audience so far. And as we learned while visiting the set of Suicide Squad back in July 2015, Ayer’s cast is as strange as they are sadistic (in the best way possible).

But with so many comic book characters to pull from for this live-action Squad, we’re here to give a tease of what to expect, a glimpse into each character’s origins in the DCEU, and whatever insights we could pry out of the filmmakers. Needless to say, there will be some minor SPOILERS ahead (but if you’re aware of the cast’s origins in DC Comics, you’ve got a headstart).


Deadshot

The roster that makes up the title squad is something of a revolving door by nature, since those who don’t get with the program wind up with their heads exploding. But from the very first version of the team in John Ostrander’s original “Suicide Squad” comic series, to the version of the team in DC’s New 52, the killer ensemble had been led by one man: Deadshot. Known as one of the deadliest assassins in the DC Universe, Deadshot a.k.a. Floyd Lawton has the precision and strategy needed to keep his fellow convicts in line.

And, no surprise, David Ayer singled him out at the front of the line when we asked how he went about picking which DC characters would be appearing in his first entry in the DC Extended Universe:

“I mean Deadshot’s a no-brainer, because he’s just a core element of that team… he’s a supervillain. I mean, he’s a bad guy. They’re all bad guys, that’s the beauty of this… I think Will’s incredibly versatile and can handle any kind of role you throw at him. He’s definitely… it’s funny because none of the normal words apply. I wouldn’t say he’s the father figure of the team, because it’s like herding cats. They don’t care. But he definitely has that the leadership quality, and it’s a great character for him.”

If it’s hard to discern whether Ayer is referring to Smith‘s ability to herd his colleagues, or Lawton‘s, that actually wouldn’t be surprising. Much has been made about the camaraderie of the movie’s cast (with Ayer calling it “rare”), and nearly everyone we spoke with on set implied that Smith has, unsurprisingly, led the charge. But as for Lawton, his character’s origin has changed over the years.

Originally introduced as a marksman who “never misses” emerging in Gotham City, Deadshot’s backstory was tragic from the start. As the child of a truly dysfunctional and hateful family, Floyd’s life hit rock bottom when he accidentally shot his older brother to death. Vowing to never again miss his target, the death wish that came along with the killing never left him. In modern comics, the role of Floyd’s daughter, Zoe, has been used as the main reason for his humanity, working to provide and protect (often in secret) both her and her mother.

Producer Andy Horwitz explained that the movie version will call on both the classic and New 52 versions, “pieced together between all of the elements that David liked.” Early set photos showing Floyd presumably before he was captured had him shopping with an unnamed daughter, so expect to see her used to ground and humanize him, no matter what actions he took that landed him in prison. A leading character who is also a devoted parent is still a new idea for comic book movies, and producer Richard Suckle stated his belief that the Squad will show aspects of their lives and personalities that “you don’t necessarily get to see in comic book films.”


Harley Quinn

The casting of Harley Quinn may not have made the biggest waves in the realm of comic books, but for those who love the character, Batman: The Animated Series, or the Batman: Arkham video games, no comic book casting was more of a dream come true – not just that Margot Robbie landed the part, but that she was being brought to live-action at all. And as fans have likely heard in any conversation regarding Robbie’s role, all on set were quick to praise her dedication, training, and performance.

We also saw clear confirmation that the version of Harley Quinn would be pulling largely from the New 52 version. Beginning as Dr. Harleen Quinzel, a psychotherapist working with Joker in Arkham Asylum, Harleen soon learns that you can’t get close to Joker without it leaving a mark. A shift towards the insane, and a dip in the same chemical bath that created Joker unites the two (referred to on set as “the chemical wedding”). But David Ayer told us that Robbie’s homework began with her sane personality, since that’s what ultimately informs her crazed character:

“With Margot, you know, [her homework was] books about psychopathology. She’s supposed to be a psychiatrist, she’s a trained person. Harley is this kid who grew up in Brooklyn, poor family, her dad was in and out of prison, and all this stuff. So these are all layers to research, and what is the core of this character, and then how do you build up from there? So she should understand all these things. I mean she went to hospitals and things like that, everybody got really deep into their work.”

It was also confirmed to us on set that the audience would be treated to a number of flashbacks to the time when Joker and Harley ruled Gotham’s underworld, establishing the pair as equals, first and foremost.

So that covers her upbringing (kid from the streets pursues medicine to escape them, winds up ruling them), but what about her role in the team? We asked producer Richard Suckle how a woman – an admittedly unbalanced woman, sure – with a baseball bat could prove just as effective as a pyromancer and a flawless assassin. And just as David Ayer claimed that it’s a villain’s refusal to follow formulas or rules that makes them hard to beat, Suckle confirms that Harley Quinn is the poster child of that very idea:

“She’s funny, she’s sexy, she’s crazy. The spectrum in which she gets to go through the movie gives her a lot of shapes and a lot of colors and… unpredictability is probably the best word to encapsulate what this character is. And that’s one of the great things about her, because you don’t know what she’s going to do from one moment to the next. Whatever it is, it’s totally true to who she is because she really does have all those shades within the character itself.”

After seeing some of Margot Robbie’s stuntwork for ourselves, we doubt many in the audience will have questions concerning how well she can handle herself in a fight.


Colonel Rick Flag

It was a role at one time destined to be played by Tom Hardy, before another production forced him out. Yet Joel Kinnaman (House of Cards) was the next to nab it, playing the role of Colonel Rick Flag, the military man saddled with this band of misfits for unknown reasons (at least, at this point). In the comics, the origin was a familiar one to any fan of military/action films: having lost his entire unit on a mission gone bad, Rick Flag signed up for one suicide mission after another (a death wish being one thing he and Deadshot have in common).

While he came by his role a bit differently than the rest of the cast, producer Richard Suckle made it clear that Kinnaman was bringing just what’s needed for the role – possibly the most difficult one out of the entire cast:

“Joel Kinnaman is a great actor… being really the ‘straight man’ of this group and the kind of wrangling he has to do. He, like the rest of the Squad, doesn’t necessarily want to be here. But he works for Amanda Waller, which means he has to do whatever Amanda Waller says. So not necessarily an A-level assignment on the surface, but he’s playing the parent to the sort of class of clowns and the unruly kids, and Joel plays it beautifully. He’s just got an incredible presence and has to deal with each of them in their own way… He has to be able to manage all those relationships and personalities… in a way that ultimately will get the job done, which makes his job very difficult.”

From what we observed on set, the classic dynamic between Deadshot and Flag will be alive and well. The two are most likely the most seasoned, disciplined, determined, and deadly. But when both wind up wanting to be the one calling the shots… things are going to get interesting.

That handles the fictional ensemble nature of his role in the team dynamics, but to guarantee that the role of an experienced soldier was played accurately, David Ayer made sure that Kinnaman was given a small (but brutal) glimpse of what a man like Rick Flag would be trained to endure. Producer Andy Horwitz explains:

“He did a ton of training. He really did. David, obviously, coming from a military background, it was very important for him to get the military aspects of Flag’s character correct, and obviously the other military aspects in the movie. So we had real Navy SEALs, that are actually in the film as well, that worked with Joel and did a full immersion for a few nights in the middle of nowhere. Sleeping out in the cold, and not sleeping, and working out every day.”

The film’s trailer have shown a few looks at Kinnaman’s no-nonsense colonel, showing that he doesn’t quite see himself as anything but this gang’s commanding officer. There’s obvious comedy in that, but Ayer emphasized that with such a hard, gritty, and dangerous mission at hand, there wasn’t room for the role of Rick Flag to be anything less than accurate to the real thing:

“With Joel, he’s playing like a Tier-1 crew military officer, you know, in the special forces community so I really loaded him up with material that could kind of give an understanding of the mindset and lifestyle… There’s this book by Charlie Beckwith about Delta Force, a great, great book and really inspirational… about the constitution of this sort of person.”

In other words: expect Flag to do the armed services proud (despite his squad’s best efforts, we’re sure).


Boomerang

Every team needs a mascot, and every collection of a dirty half-dozen needs at least one wild card just as likely to botch the mission as accomplish it. In Suicide Squad, that is absolutely, without a doubt, Captain Boomerang (Jai Courtney). That’s technically in keeping with the comic book source material, where George “Digger” Harkness proved to be more of a liability than an asset to his teammates, only using his skills with a boomerang when his life – not necessarily their’s – depended on it.

From the first photo of Courtney in costume, it was obvious that was still going to be the case. Smug, self-satisfied, and more than a little bit crazy, the addition of a physically imposing size and razor-sharp projectiles only makes him harder to control. As David Ayer confirms, the truth is exactly as it appears:

“It is a lot of fun to see Boomerang, Captain Boomerang… who is sort of the most villainous of all these characters. And it’s just been a blast creating this absolutely kinetic, out of control force of nature with Jai. You know the character paradigms – he’s like ‘Evil Chaotic’.”

For those who may not know the “Alignments” Ayer is referring to in fiction, ‘Chaotic Evil’ is used to describe characters who are “hot-tempered, vicious, arbitrarily violent, unpredictable., ruthless, brutal” and deeply self-serving. Thankfully, those kinds of people don’t make the most intelligent plans – but they make terrific blunt instruments. At the time of our set visit, the world had yet to see Boomerang in action, cracking open a beer in the middle of a fight. But while getting a breakdown of the character from producer Richard Suckle, the beer holster, gold tooth, and general ‘brawler’ style spoke for itself:

“This character is like… You can just look at him, and I’m sure the way you would describe him without me telling you what he does in the movie would probably be very close to what I’m about to say. He is a wise ass. He’s kind of a punk, to a certain extent and he’s got an incredible wise cracking sense of humor. But at the same time, he is equally dangerous, and has these very dangerous boomerangs… He’s just a fun character that shakes things up and also has a level of unpredictability as well.”

As we learned more about the character (and how it’s finally allowing the star of A Good Day to Die Hard and Terminator: Genisys to show his humor – and accent), the links between character and actor started to multiply. While the character is obviously an out of control nutjob, even Courtney admits that Boomer’s personality is the closest to himself than any of the roles American audiences would recognize him from. But those curious to know if the character will be based on the older, more dated version of Harkness, or his younger, hipper son Owen… will probably have to wait, according to the actor:

“I think it is somewhat of an amalgamation [of the comic versions of Boomerang], is probably the fairest thing to say. I was curious about that… but we haven’t set something up that we are bound by. David and I had a discussion about that early on. So, who knows? Within this property, I guess that leaves room and freedom, in a sense, to kind of go either way. But at this stage it is not necessarily specified.”

On the surface, it seems that it’s Digger Harkness being updated, while keeping his abrasive yet undeniably endearing ‘free spirit’ intact. One wonders how much of a glimpse into his backstory will really be needed. But from Courtney’s comments, we would assume it’s what Boomer’s up to now that will be the most important (and dangerous to his squadmates).


Enchantress

Suicide Squad Enchantress Origin Suicide Squad: Character Origins & Team Roles Explained

For reasons concerning the actual plot, twists, and conflict of the movie, the details surrounding Enchantress (Cara Delevingne) have been kept quiet, at least officially. We know that Delevingne will begin as June Moon, just like the comics, before an encounter with an ancient, supernatural entity transforms her into ‘The Enchantress.’ Whether she’s a villain, the villain, or one of the villains is still anyone’s guess. The trailers have shown a few looks at June Moon interacting with other characters before absorbing… something in a subterranean cave.

But, obviously, it was her appearance as the Enchantress that producer Andy Horwitz singled out as an indicator of her role and importance:

“Yeah. Cara Delevingne, Enchantress. I think this is, you know, it’s a little bit of a different Enchantress look than the comics, of course, but Cara’s obviously… she was our first choice for the role and I think it makes a lot of sense. She plays both June Moon and Enchantress in the movie. Both looks are extremely different, of course. But this was a look that we were all really excited about. I think it really embodies her character in the movie and it’s something different, unique.”

Unique it most certainly is, especially considering what Enchantress typically looks like in the comic books. In short: a witch, with her pointed hat and dress dyed green. The revealing costume (minus the mud-like substance caked on Delevingne’s body in varying thicknesses) may still be greenish(?), but if there’s one character that’s been dramatically overhauled for film, it’s June Moon.

While we have our own theory on the role she’ll play in the story (and the “Suicide Squad” comic David Ayer teased as his inspiration), it’s clear that the magical aspects of her character are most definitely being adapted faithfully. How that works with the DC Extended Universe down the line remains to be seen, but it was a challenge (or opportunity) that David Ayer was well aware of when beginning to assembled his cast and script. And according to Horwitz and Suckle, that means fans can expect to see her comic book origin story and powers honored:

“RS: Once we decided, and David felt that the Enchantress should be part of the movie… you’re embracing what comes along with her. It just sort of naturally happened… and as soon as David said ‘I want her to be a part of the movie,’ the qualities and the attributes and the abilities that she has come along with her.”

“AH: It is [an evolution]. And I think… she is a witch. Sorcerer’s another way to describe her, but at the end of the day she’s a witch, and I think, what would a contemporary modern-day witch look like? And so, for us I think trying to sort of take her old look… and ‘contemporize’ it and make it a little bit darker and a little bit more witch-like, I think. A little more grounded, a little more real. So this is what we came up with.”

There was concept art depicting an alternate look at Enchantress more in keeping with her comic book version (but far, far more regal and intricate), and a tease from costume designer Kate Hawley that her character undergoes multiple “transitions.” The facts are still under wraps, but it’s obvious that the occult element is going to make Suicide Squad as much of a horror story as a gangster one.


Joker

There have been several different versions of The Joker over the years, from Cesar Romero and Jack Nicholson’s comic book villains brought to life, to the twisted anarchist of Heath Ledger’s take in The Dark Knight. Yet the first image released of Jared Leto in his Suicide Squad costume/makeup/tattoos promised something very, very, different – and audiences were divided. For some, it was over-designed, trying too hard, and hard to look at. For others, that disgust and crazed aesthetic were the entire point, and Jared Leto’s Joker was handcrafted for David Ayer’s idea of comic book street crime.

Joker has always been something of a kingpin in Gotham’s underworld, even if it was based more on fear than actual respect or intimidation. But with Suicide Squad showing Joker as the king of the city’s criminals, his power needs to be backed up in a way that makes sense. According to producer Richard Suckle, it’s cash and status that make him an unparalleled crime boss:

“He’s a business man. He’s crazy of course, and he kills people, but… he’s running a business. If you could imagine the head of any successful corporation, he runs his business that way. He just happens to be a psychopath. He’s very, very conscientious of his business and he’s also very conscientious of the way he dresses. Style is a really big part of this Joker. It would be important to him to know what next year’s Prada would be like because he may want to have it a year before everybody else.”

That’s obviously not the whole story, since Joker and Harley were also claimed to have killed their way to the top. But it adds another wrinkle to this incarnation: that as manic or out of control as he may seem, he knows his line of work.

Our discussion of the character with costume designer Kate Hawley added some insights, from the foundation of real-world drug cartel leaders who spent their millions on gold, cars, and cutting edge fashion, to foreign soldiers posing barefoot on piles of corpses. So as outrageous as his tattoos, hair, or fashion might seem, Hawley told us, it’s still in the image of classic (and real) gangsters that Leto’s Joker was born:

“I think that’s the biggest thing with David, is about ‘chasing the real’ and what that means in David’s world, so that’s been a big journey and a very organic one… When I first met him he wanted a very gritty, urban world. That if you think of all the Suicide Squad related in some way in this underworld, in this urban kind of environment, then Joker and Harley are like King and Queen of that.”

From his massive ring placed out for other criminals (or victims) to kiss, to his ostentatious guns, knives, and clothing, Joker’s backstory is as mysterious as ever. But there may be a bit more history justifying his personality and power this time around… and if he seems to be taking things to extremes, that’s probably the point.


Katana

The comic book version of Katana is born out of the worst kinds of tragedy. Having started a life in her civilian identity of Tatsu Yamshiro, she enjoyer her loving husband and two children – before her husband’s brother arrived to claim her. Challenging Tatsu’s husband to a duel for the woman’s love, the fight spun wildly out of control, seeing her husband murdered, and her children lost in the ensuing fire. Overcome with loss and rage, Tatuso overpowered the slayer of her family, but fled upon realizing that her husband’s spirit had been absorbed into the katana that struck him down: Soultaker.

Taking the name of ‘Katana,’ her superheroine career would take her around the world, enjoying stints with the Birds of Prey, Outsiders, and the Suicide Squad (usually being honor-bound to one mission or another). On the film side, it will be newcomer Karen Fukahara in the role, and everything we heard on set suggested that the character’s origins will definitely be in play here – even if they aren’t explored in this film. That’s according to Fukuhara:

“It helps a lot when you know the backstory of her character because… in this movie I don’t think you see much of that, but bringing that and knowing that at the back of my mind really helps with playing the character… Not only just the mental part in doing the research behind the character in terms of comics, but also physically. Like, looking the part and also being able to do all the stunts.”

Actresses doing their own stunts was a common refrain on set, with both Margot Robbie and Fukuhara singled out for their dedication to training for and performing their character’s fight choreography. There are obviously some exceptions, but any time you can actually get the actors on screen pulling off the action, it’s a win for the audience.

As for her role on the team? Well, while producer Andy Horwitz describes here as “the whip, I think, when Flag needs to crack the whip,” Fukuhara herself offered an even clearer description, steeped in both Japanese culture and Katana’s track record in the comics:

“She’s the protector of Rick Flag. So I’d like to think she’s still one of the only characters that’s so-called ‘good’ or, you know, heroic. She has her own moral code, and she has… it’s a Japanese word called giri-ninjo which is… I don’t know the technical meaning of that so you can look it up [laughs]. But you know, her oath to give back to who she owes it to. And I think for this movie it’s Rick Flag. Along with Amanda Waller… but who knows what she’s thinking.”

For those unfamiliar with Japanese cinema or storytelling, the term ‘giri-ninjo’ literally means a combination of ‘compassion’ and ‘social obligation.’ As in, a hero or heroine who is brought into emotional or moral conflict by being forced to serve a mission their humanity can not allow, or show emotion when their loyalty demands a different course.

We don’t know where that will lead Katana or the Squad, but the glimpses of her communing with the souls in her sword, and undergoing some kind of transformation (eyes flashing to entirely white) prove her story will get mystical. And as producer Richard Suckle confirms, comic fans will be able to connect the dots:

“She’s a character of few words. Her entrance into the movie is quite cool, in the way she is introduced to everybody and to us… She’s definitely a mysterious character, but we’re not suppressing anything that the character from the canon would’ve brought… the whole story with the Soultaker and how her dead husband is trapped in the sword, and she speaks to it. It’s really, I have to say, emotional. It’s really wonderful.”


Killer Croc

It’s hard to believe that such a terrifying creature could have begun his life as an innocent, impressionable young boy. But such was the origin of Waylon Jones – in the pages of DC Comics and its animated universe – when a rare skin disease/genetic mutation began causing him to look less than human, at least in a skin-deep sense. Over time that pain turned to rage, eventually leading him to become the villain known as ‘Killer Croc,’ possessing immense strength, durability, and determination (especially when it came to Batman, the figure standing in the way of criminal domination).

When we spoke with Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje on set, he confirmed that such an origin was at the heart of his character:

“He’s a boy that’s been tortured, humiliated, ostracized, ridiculed… Waylon Jones, his backstory in the comics. Obviously, in my research that’s what I used to kind of establish who Waylon was as an adult. But definitely all of that….because ultimately – and any of the characters you will notice, but ultimately in Croc – he just wants to be loved. But because he’s been ostracized, he’s made that work for him.”

We don’t know what to expect from his actual fighting style, superpowers, or specialty on the Squad, but it’s obviously his appearance that’s guaranteed to turn heads. And as much as Joker and Harley may rule the nightclub scene of Gotham’s criminal sphere, it sounds like Croc isn’t used to following someone else’s rules, either:

“David was very insistent on making it very real… He’s not crocodile, he’s a man. So we wanted to show that in as many aspects as we could, from the skin tone, to not using [contact] lenses, and even to his attire… in the world of Gotham, this is a super villain that was really going toe to toe with Batman and about to take over. After we really analyze and evaluate that history, it was like, “Well, he wouldn’t really just be hiding simply under there depressed.” He’s owning that world… It was very important for David and I to have him celebrate that world and literally reign in the sewer. That is his kingdom, the underground.”


Diablo

It’s clear that writer/director David Ayer turned to the world of DC’s New 52 for a few reasons, not the least of which is the inclusion of Diablo, also known as Chato Santana in the comics. The title has been held by a few through DC history, but Santana claimed it after rising to the very top of a fictional Los Angeles gang. After seeking revenge by burning down the building a rival gang called home, Chato learns that women and children were also killed in the blaze he started.

In the comics,his power to control, absorb, or project fire was tied to a demonic entity that had previously cursed a preceding version, but whatever the origin of his power, the murder of innocents is too much for Chato to bear. He surrenders to the police and willingly begins to serve his sentence within the walls of Bell Reve (specially designed to accommodate someone of his… abilities). But while discussing the character with producers Richard Suckle and Andy Horwitz, it turns out that the character’s roots in Los Angeles are one element that attracted the attention of Ayer:

“RS: Jay’s a fantastic actor and goes through a pretty amazing transformation and it’s a great character. He’s got obviously his own [superpowered] abilities and even just looking at the design of his jacket was something that was very, very particular about what David wanted. David having grown up in East LA and all the details, from the jacket design to the tattoos…

“AH: …Inspired by what the logos [of real L.A. gangs] look like, and how they wear things. It’s all, I mean everything about it, his tattoos, and his logo, even the 213 on his hand for the East LA area code, it’s all very real.”

Aside from the connection to the very real criminal side of Los Angeles, it sounds like the character’s origin will be in keeping with the source material, with Horwitz noting that the lack of mainstream ‘Diablo’ fans allowed more creativity – “but the backstories and obviously his abilities are all very much based on the comic books.”


Slipknot

If there’s one member of the team who’s taken up less of the spotlight, it’s unquestionably Slipknot (Adam Beach). The villain has a… memorable costume in the comic book source material, but the actual character details are probably not going to be playing a major factor in the film. Since nearly every Suicide Squad story requires one member of the team to try their luck and learn the hard way that Amanda Waller wasn’t kidding about the explosive planted in their brains. Considering how little has been seen of Beach in the film’s marketing (aside from using his signature grapply gun to zip up, up, and away from the rest of the team), the smart money is on Slipknot leaving them team in pieces.

But that doesn’t mean the character can’t be given a memorable role on the big screen, even if it is a brief one. And producer Andy Horwitz explained that Slipknot’s look on film may have been among the hardest to figure out:

“Adam Beach. One of the nicest human beings on planet Earth. Slipknot is one of those characters not a lot of people know about, but he is cool. He’s got some serious abilities and I think his outfit, which I think took a little bit of back and forth to figure out what he was going to look like because I think his outfit in the comics is pretty goofy. It really is. We knew we had to stay away from that and figure out a contemporary, cool version of that. I think this was it. I think everything that he wears and he uses is very utilitarian. It’s all useful and you get to see him use it and how he uses it, and he’s a very cool character. Mysterious character. You don’t know a lot about him.”


Amanda Waller

She may not be a member of the Squad, but as the one who decides what causes their lives are risked to advance (or stall), Amanda Waller (Viola Davis) is a powerhouse in her own rite. The trailers have shown her making an argument in front of Washington executives, but from the sounds of it, Waller will more than live up to her skull-cracking reputation in the movie, according to producer Richard Suckle:

“What’s so cool about [Viola Davis] is, because she’s so nice and so friendly and so warm and giving, that when she has to play Amanda it’s like you watch another person come out of nowhere. The best way I can put it, she’s just a bad motherf***er. I mean, honestly, you just do not want to cross Amanda Waller.

“As bad as she may be, and I say the word ‘bad’ because she’s forcing people against their will, she also has a very distinct point of view and she’s doing it for what, in her mind, is the right reason. Which is a unique take on… I hate to say bad guy, but she’s a great character that is so counterpoint to the rest of the cast. You don’t f*** with her because the consequences are worse than what she was asking you to do.”



http://screenrant.com/suicide-squad-mov ... explained/


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Re: Película del "SUICIDE SQUAD"

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- Detalles del panel en el SDCC del "Suicide Squad":
Esta semana se celebrará la convención anual del "San Diego Comic Con", y la Warner ha revelado oficialmente los detalles sobre su muy anticipado panel en el Hall H, que tendrá lugar el Sábado 23 de Julio.

Entre las películas que lleva este año el estudio, se encuentran las muy esperadas "Wonder Woman" y el "Suicide Squad". No hay signo alguno de la "Justice League" en la nota de prensa, aunque el director Zack Snyder y el elenco de la película siempre pueden hacer apariciones sorpresa. El panel estará moderado por Conan O’Brien.


Comenzando a las 11:30 a.m., los miembros que aparecerán de cada película son:

• “Wonder Woman” las estrellas Gal Gadot, Chris Pine y Connie Nielsen y la directora Patty Jenkins.
• “Suicide Squad” las estrellas Will Smith, Jared Leto, Margot Robbie, Joel Kinnaman, Viola Davis, Jai Courtney, Jay Hernandez, Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje, Scott Eastwood, Cara Delevingne, Adam Beach y Karen Fukuhara, junto con el escritor/director David Ayer.

Además, el mismo día los actores de ambas películas estarán firmando autógrafos a los fans y se mostrarán los trajes en la sala de exposiciones de la Convención.


Adicionalmente, en la nota de prensa también se incluye una sinopsis del "Suicide Squad":
Del director David Ayer llega el “Suicide Squad,” protagonizado por el nominado al Oscar Will Smith, el ganador del Oscar Jared Leto, Margot Robbie, Joel Kinnaman y la nominada al Oscar Viola Davis. Se siente bien el ser malo… Reunir un equipo con los los más peligroso y encarcelados super-villanos, proporcionarles el arsenal más poderoso a disposición del gobierno, y mandarles a una misión para derrotar a una enigmática e insuperable entidad. La oficial de inteligencia de los EEUU Amanda Waller ha determinado que sólo un recretamente reunido grupo de viles y dispares individuos con nada que perder lo hará. Sin embargo, cuando se dan cuenta de que no fueron escogidos para que tuvieran éxito sino por su patente culpabilidad cuando inevitablemente fallen, ¿decidirá el Suicide Squad morir intentándolo, o decidirá que se salve el que pueda?

Escrita y dirigida por Ayerbasada en los personajes de DC, la película también está protagonizada por Jai Courtney, Jay Hernandez, Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje, Ike Barinholtz, Scott Eastwood, Cara Delevingne, Adam Beach, y Karen Fukuhara en su debut en películas. Está producida por Charles Roven y Richard Suckle, con Zack Snyder, Deborah Snyder, Colin Wilson y Geoff Johns como productores ejecutivos. Warner Bros. Pictures presents, una producción de Atlas Entertainment production,una película de David Ayer, “Suicide Squad.” La película estará distribuida mundialmente por Warner Bros. Pictures, Warner Bros. Entertainment Company. La película se estrena mundialmente en 3D, y en 2D, y en determinados cines IMAX 3D el 05 de Agosto del 2016. “Suicide Squad” está valorada como PG-13 por la MPAA por secuencias de violencia y acción en toda la película, comportamiento perturbador y contenido y lenguaje sugerente. www.suicidesquad.com


http://heroichollywood.com/warner-bros- ... l-details/


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Re: Película del "SUICIDE SQUAD"

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- Revelados nuevos detalles del ‘Suicide Squad’:
El "Suicide Squad" llegará a nuestros cines en menos de un mes, pero nos llegan nuevas informaciones desde el set de la película. Collider ha publicado una extensa cobertura, aunque pasamos a enumerar las cosas más destacables:


- Suicide Squad cuanta con un número de secuencias en flashback que incolucvran a The Joker y Harley Quinn, pero la historia del presente tiene lugar tras los eventos de "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice".

- A pesar del hecho de que la película gira en torno a tantos personajes, Ayer cree que Deadshot es el personaje principal. Específicamente escribió el papel para Will Smith.

- Joker se suponía que originalmente iba a llevar puesto su clásico traje morado. Eso cambió después de que Jared Leto firmara para interpretar al personaje.

- Joker y Harley ambos son encerrados en Arkham Asylum.

- Midway City “está a mitad de camino entre” Gotham y Metropolis.

- Scott Eastwood efectivamente interpreta a un Navy SEAL llamado GQ, quien aparentemente es un personaje original.

- Hay una historia de amor entre Rick Flag y June Moone a.k.a. the Enchantress.

- El coordinador de especialistas de "Mad Max: Fury Road" Guy Norris trabajó en el proyecto como director de la segunda unidad.

- Ayer trabajó con Geoff Johns para escribir a algunos de los personajes.



Para leer el artículo al completo:

http://collider.com/suicide-squad-things-to-know/



También podéis encontrar un resumen muy completo de todas las informaciones aquí:

http://comicbook.com/dc/2016/07/11/here ... set-visit/
http://www.fandango.com/movie-news/10-h ... d_SetVisit


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Shelby
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Re: Película del "SUICIDE SQUAD"

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- Reveladas nuevas imágenes en HQ:

Imagen Imagen Imagen Imagen Imagen Imagen Imagen Imagen Imagen Imagen Imagen Imagen Imagen


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Re: Película del "SUICIDE SQUAD"

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- David Ayer sobre el rodar la película, dirigir a Joker y trabajar en el Universo DC (collider):
David Ayer sobre el rodar la película, dirigir a Joker y trabajar en el Universo DC
Por Adam Chitwood 11 Julio, 2016


Suicide Squad is, in many ways, the most exciting film of the DC Extended Universe thus far. What makes the picture unique is that this will be the first movie in this interconnected series of DC Comics adaptations that is not directed by Zack Snyder, therefore allowing audiences to see for the first time what a different director’s vision looks like within this same universe. And from the moment it was announced that David Ayer would be at the helm of Suicide Squad, it was clear that Warner Bros. would be enlisting some serious talent to direct its own slate of superhero movies.

Ayer’s career thus far has delved into the unflinching grittiness of the real world, be it South Central Los Angeles gangs in his directorial debut Harsh Times, the day-to-day of a pair of L.A. cops in End of Watch, or the ugliness of the tail end of World War II in Fury. With Suicide Squad, Ayer’s penchant for hardened stories meets the realm of the supernatural, and that mix thus far looks to be quite excellent.

Last summer I got the opportunity to visit the Toronto set of Suicide Squad along with a small group of reporters, and during our time there we were able to speak with Ayer as he was in between takes of shooting a scene involving Killer Croc’s dwellings in the Belle Reve prison facility. As both writer and director of Suicide Squad, the film is unmistakably Ayer’s, and so it was a joy to dive deep in our conversation, covering everything from his decision to shoot on film, how 70s movies like Serpico influenced his approach, the female characters’ costumes versus the men’s, working within an established universe, and why he wanted to put Batman in the movie. The conversation also, of course, touched heavily on Ayer’s relationship with Jared Leto in forming this new iteration of The Joker, and how he went about directing an actor who was in character the entire time.

If you’re at all interested in Suicide Squad from a filmmaking standpoint as well as story and character, I think you’ll find this interview worthwhile.

Question: This is your third film with [cinematographer] Roman Vasyanov. I was curious what kind of early aesthetic conversations there were about Suicide Squad. It looks pretty striking. I saw you’re shooting on film, which is great.

DAVID AYER: Film. The big decision is film. Once you commit to film, it kind of drives a lot of things about the visual in the movie. I think you can do more with film, and film has a more real organic quality than digital. It’s a lot kinder to faces, that’s for sure. When you’re doing something where people are made up, and you have so many constructed sets and everything, I think film sort of melts things together and makes everything feel very natural. Whereas, digital, you can see every pore, every detail. Sometimes you feel the makeup, you can see the makeup.

Part of what we’re doing, our references are ’70s movies, like Prince of the City, Serpico. We’re using an older series of anamorphic lenses. We’re after an old-school look, which I think … You’re taking a subject matter which is exceptional unto itself, and then photographing in a way that’s very naturalistic and real. I think it has the effect of bringing them into our world.

When you were writing this, how important was it to stay faithful to the comics?

AYER: It’s interesting, it’s … What I did is sort of an amalgamation, because I love the Ostrander series, and there’s some fantastic situations and the concept of it is very solidly there. This idea of this team of bad guys run by Amanda Waller doing dirty work for the government. But in The New ’52, it’s also—I mean there’s the craziness of it in the New ’52, and obviously Diablo’s out of the New ’52 world. There just really hasn’t been too many opportunities for like a Hispanic kind of villain, superhero comic book character, and he plays a pretty important role in this. That’s something that’s important to me so I kind of cherry picked him to pull him into this. Obviously Croc, he doesn’t feature in the original Ostrander series but the situations—I’m not going to tell you which one I pulled the plot out of, but pretty much everything that happens is true to the source material, whether it’s Ostrander’s work in New ’52 or from the Joker comics or other source material.

Talking about diversity, when we first got up into the concept art room there’s this wonderful wall with all of the characters on it but all of the men, well not all of the men but the majority of the men are in armor or, you know, military grade and then all of the girls are either mostly naked or bare mid-drifts and it’s a little disheartening. What was the thought process behind putting Katana into a two piece rather than a cat suit? Or making Enchantress as naked as humanly possible for a PG-13 movie?

AYER: I just wanted to see Waller in a bikini. I mean really that drove everything for me (laughs). For me it’s, if you look at the aesthetic of comic books and you look at how the imagery of it and sort of what it means and what it drives, you have these hyper-masculine men and you have these very feminine women. I don’t think that it’s a contradiction to say that a woman can be traditionally attractive and feminine and very strong and a very tight dame, very aggressive. So I think that’s something you build into the characters and I think it’s also just, I think it’s a trope of the genre.

Did you feel any need to poke at it at all? Will there be any kind of in-universe acknowledgement that, “Hey, Harley Quinn’s fighting in 5″ stiletto heels?”

AYER: She’s freaking scary. I’m kind of glad she’s in stiletto heels because if she was in anything else she would be even more scary. It’s interesting because when I see Margot out of wardrobe now I literally don’t recognize her. I don’t know who she is. She’s an example of somebody who has totally become the character and transformed herself and embraced this. I think that’s part of the fun. I’m just speaking about Harley Quinn specifically, there’s a sexuality, there’s an attractiveness, there’s a pinch of attractiveness to the character but when you understand how that character thinks, she almost uses that as a weapon to disarm people and kind of as a visual judo to get what she wants. That’s a big part of how Margot is playing the role. I think it’s, there’s an intrinsic sort of wank and awareness that that’s part of her game.

You’re saying you wrote the role of Deadshot for Will Smith and I was wondering, did you guys have some kind of relationship before that? How did you guys come together?

AYER: I think for Will, he wanted to play in this world and this just seemed like a fantastic opportunity. Deadshot’s a great character. What’s great about these characters is that they’re pretty well known. To the fans they’re very well known. But there’s a vast audience that doesn’t know these characters so it’s also an opportunity to sort of visually reinvent them and also to tell these stories of who they are. Deadshot, all these characters in the Suicide Squad world have this complexity about them. My pitch when I went to the studio about this was, they’re villains that don’t know they’re bad guys. They don’t know they’re bad guys. They’re just people who have made some really bad decisions in life and ended up in a bad place and are trying to do everything we want to do which is live, love, be happy.

A guy like Will, who typically plays these very positive characters, to put him in a role with a little grey and a little complexity is perfect because he’s so sympathetic and he’s got such a good heart as a person, it comes across the screen. It just made sense.

Can you talk about how you direct Jared as he’s method acting? How do you direct someone who is in the character of The Joker?

AYER: It’s interesting because Jared is one of the first people I cast in this, and so those conversations and the character development, how to build this character have a lot of history between us. I understand how he’s built the character. I understand what he’s doing. It’s a little bit of like I know the magic trick. I know how the rabbit is hidden in the hat before you pull it out. He’s very professional and we’ve had a lot of discussions about his journey and his mindset in what are the pieces that become this character. As far as our on-set work it’s fantastic because, a little more of this, a little less of that, a little more of this secret ingredient here and a little less of that secret ingredient.

Plus the guy’s a rock star. He’s a bona fide rock star and so he has this incredible sense of presence, innate performance but also an incredible musicality about what he’s doing. He’s really found the voice of this character and I think people are going to be surprised because even though there’s some new visual elements to the Joker, when you see him on screen in aggregate as the character, I think it’s going to be hard for anyone to ever imagine anyone else as the Joker.

Can you talk about the decision to tackle Joker, coming off of the Heath Ledger performance? Was that always your intention with this project to do that? And can you talk a little bit about coming up with the look for him? I mean, obviously you’re online and you see that it’s getting a divisive response from the tattoos.

AYER: Yeah, that’s the thing. It’s definitely, the Joker’s sort of the third rail of the DC Comics world, right? And Heath and his work is in the Pantheon. That shouldn’t preclude reinvention. It’s the most iconic bad guy in any medium. For me, what an incredible opportunity to reinvent, to have some fun with the character, and to use him in the role of Suicide Squad, and that’s what’s so fun about what Warners is doing with the DC universe now is cross-connecting these films so that different characters can enter and leave and go through these doors and have these worlds link up.

We came at it with an incredible respect for the history of the Joker, and I’ve read every freaking comic. If you look at—I grew up on the Batman TV show, the Adam West TV show. Look at the incarnation of the Joker in that, look at how the Joker has evolved. So I don’t think we should freeze him in ice and never let him evolve with us as we evolve as an audience. As far as visual development of Joker, I wanted a guy who felt like he had history and he wears his history. This is a guy with some prowess and presence in the criminal world and I want him to feel like a modern day criminal. I want him to feel like someone that you believe could emerge from today’s underworld.

How does the fact that this movie exists in a larger cinematic universe affect your take on it or how you direct it, or does it?

AYER: It’s interesting. I’m sharing some assets with other movies and some things I’m doing will be established and then sort of handed—there will be a baton passed to other directors and other projects. But it’s like no one handed me a style guide. Nobody handed me a manual and said, “These are the numbers you’ve got to hit.” I’ve had really an open hand to develop this world, but I’ve worked with Zack. I’ve talked with Zack. I know what Zack’s doing on his movies and how this will interface. So it’s being respectful of his work and as I say, I’m just standing at the shoulders of giants here. So many people have come before me in the genre, I really feel blessed to be able to play in this world and then to be able to spin off the bad kids version is just a lot of fun for me.

Is A.R.G.U.S. a factor here?

AYER: (Hesitates)…Yes A.R.G.U.S. is a factor. There’s A.R.G.U.S. Assets and it plays in and has a shadow and a footprint. I don’t think I should say more than that.

What can you say about the casting of Viola Davis as Amanda Waller?

AYER: She’s like a no-brainer. If you think about Amanda Waller, she has to be scarier than the supervillains that she manages, and Viola is incredible. It’s like, for me, I think I have the best time when she’s on the set because she’s so Machiavellian and so devious and yet, you know, we’ve worked on this incredibly realistic, plausible character history. Where does she come from? Why is she like the person she’s become? In the source material, she escaped Cabrini-Green and lost her kids to street violence. I’ve always imagined her as a person who’s boot-strapped themself through the Federal Government, and just simply out of force of will and ability and capabilities, has risen up to this incredible position of power. She’s a character who demands and commands respect, but again is incredibly grounded. What I’m trying to do is have each character have their own trajectory and their own history and their own heart and their own need.

What can you tell us about the purpose of Batman in the film? Was that something that you always wanted I there or was that a studio mandate? What’s your spin on Batman?

AYER: Look, you apply at a job for a DC Comic movie and it’s like, “Come on, let me get the toys, please. Let me get the cool stuff.” I begged for that. That was really, really something I wanted. There’s a lot of information out there, a lot of false information about how these characters play into the A plot. It’s an incredibly complex story with flashbacks and different convergent storylines and things like that. I will say this at the same time, and I probably shouldn’t is, all the Batman movies have been from Batman’s point of view. He’s the good guy. He’s the hero of his own movie in all the movies we’ve seen. If you look at what Bruce Wayne has done in creating the Batman persona, his idea was to terrorize criminals. It’s sort of psychological warfare against criminals. This wraith that comes in the night and attacks and pulls criminals from society. For the first time, we’re seeing Batman from the point of view of the criminals and he’s freaking scary.

Were there any characters from this world that were maybe right on the paths for making it into the film but you didn’t get a chance to play with this time? Or some that you might be interested in following up with in any potential sequels?

AYER: I’m scared to answer that because this is anticipated to be sort of the cornerstone of more things to come, and there’s other folks that we’re going to see come and go in and out of these films. So yes, the short answer.

Can you talk some more about Enchantress? The costume design and everybody, they’ve tried to explain a little bit about what culture we’re dealing with here. It’s been very vague and if she’s possessed or what exactly is going on with her and how?

AYER: Enchantress… I will keep it also intentionally vague. She leaves a large shadow across the scope of this film. Shots to the balls over the course of it. I always imagined her as, if you look at her origin, she emerges from this cavern, this cave. I imagine her as like this, almost like this Paleolithic Goddess who was at one point sort of worshipped by primitive man. Again, it’s another character who has her own past and her own history. Her storyline and her evolution as a character figures very importantly into this construct. I don’t want to get more into her.

Your previous movies were really raw and visceral and kind of on the ground. How are you balancing that with the comic book aspect here?

AYER: I think you evolve with every movie you do as a director. I’m definitely bringing my sense of reality and characterization and grittiness to the comic genre but at the same time there are expectations—and rightly so—good expectations about what these movies need to be. There needs to be scope and scale and sort of grandeur. You have to be faithful to the source material and respect what these films are. Having said that, it’s world creation. When I did Fury, it was world creation. I couldn’t go down with a camera and film World War II. Every asset on screen had to be developed, painted, designed, engineered, placed and it’s the same thing with this. That really gave me an appetite for world creation. The trick for me is how do you take the tropes and set pieces of a comic book movie and ground them in incredibly believable ways? I want a movie where you feel like you could pass that shot on the street and not know that’s fake.

One of the aspects about the Suicide Squad in general is that it’s never the same team twice because everyone is expendable. Anyone could die any minute. Obviously in the movie as well, they want to do more. How hard is it when you’re developing characters like this is it to say, “Okay, we have this straight back story but he’s got to go?”

AYER: It’s a little scary. There’s definitely…I mean that’s the whole point of it, right, is that they are so expendable to a great degree. Because they’re criminals, so what rights do they have? What rights do they have as individuals? Even the right to live seems to be revocable, especially for Amanda Waller where any tactic works. That, exactly, figures importantly into the movie and that’s their journey is, again, you have these people that have been told by society what they are. Put in a box. Put in a cage, literally. Do they have the right to grow? Can they change? Can they be good people? Do they have the same joys, loves, spirits that we have? That’s what I’m really enjoying exploring with them.

Are you trying to get us to apologize for the penal or justice system, which could be a layer there, which might have been in the original comics, too.

AYER: I would not want to do time in Belle Reve. Not a good place.

What would you say has so far has been the biggest action set piece? Have you filmed it yet or is it yet to come?

AYER: There’s several major set pieces. I’m in the middle of one. It’s raining otherwise we’d be out there right now shooting guns, which is heartbreaking because it’s all about inertia, momentum. The set piece we’re in the middle of is probably on paper our biggest crew days, but I have a fantastic crew, incredible support. For me, it’s a pleasure to do a big studio movie because you draw on the experience of the studio, they assemble fantastic people. They put the best people around me. It’s absolutely A+ film making. Yet to get the creative freedom to get to add my spin and my flavor to it, it’s just been a real pleasure.

We were talking to the producers earlier. They said that you had a really long discussion with Geoff Johns about, you know, who to pull in maybe. Was there anything that you had no intention of using or didn’t even know existed until he brought it up and you were like, “Oh that. That has to go into the film?”

AYER: I think it’s been a great relationship with Geoff. He’s sort of the keeper of the scrolls. He’s the scribe of the DC universe over there at Warners and obviously DC Comics. With his encyclopedic knowledge it’s like, “Hey, I need a thing that can do these four things but not do this one thing.” “Oh, you need this. Da, da, da.” Boom. Okay, it’s going in the script. Having somebody who’s so absolutely literate of the DC world is fantastic and then also just, I’ve done my homework and read everything I can and I really feel like if you look at everything that’s available in the DC fiction universe and the Crisis material and all the potential storylines, the vast amount of characters, the rich villains, it has the best villains and so I feel like it’s so intact. I mean, it’s like get ready. I think it’s going to explode.

With so many characters and the expectations for set pieces as well, how do you go about balancing emotional journeys and emotional parts and servicing all of these characters in a way that feels satisfactory, but also everyone can’t have a full emotional journey.

AYER: Everybody, I think, and I told the actors, it’s an ensemble movie to a degree but everybody has their moment. Everybody has their day. Everybody has their story. And with the work they’ve done, and there’s real specificity to the character in the script, you see one frame of them you know who they are. You can feel them, which is hard to do. They’re very trackable and so much of the movie is about evolution and growth and these individuals who were isolated coming together as a family and as a team and discovering that they can love and they can have a life and that there is this camaraderie and this brotherhood and sisterhood is really powerful and that’s the journey all of them share.

Margot Robbie was telling us that you helped her tap into the character’s evil that’s below the surface? Did you have to do that with a lot of the cast?

AYER: Raising bad, I think of it as a possibility. These are people for whom any action is on the table. Any course of action or any thought. They don’t self-censor. They don’t restrict themselves to our world of possibilities and that’s the fun of them is any one of them is capable of anything. There’s a lot of back fighting and in-fighting, but as far as helping the actors, for me it’s specificity to help them tap into their own lives. Help them tap into their own experiences and their own hearts. Their own families, their own traumas, their own pains, their own loves. Any time an actor can do that it’s going to yield a better performance, I think a more honest performance. At the end of the day, like I said, sure this is a movie about supervillains but they’re just people. They’re just people, so as long as the actors are emotionally honest then the characters will feel real to us and we’ll understand because that’s the film.

The nature of the Joker, then are there going to be human elements to him? We heard the word Devil thrown around a little bit or supernatural or something. What can you say about his sort of presence and function and also sort of his bond with Harley?

AYER: Oh, it’s a fantastic relationship. The Joker, the more plausible the Joker can be the more well-rounded as a person, the more accurate his psychology can be, I think the scarier he becomes. As a character, he represents—all these characters are powerful because they represent mythologies. They’re almost like Greek Gods right out of Pantheon. I think that’s what attracts people to superhero movies. It’s like the first Comic-Con was Ancient Greece and people would dress up as their favorite Greek Gods and celebrate and stuff. So there’s something very primal and ancient about that. You simply have to look at what the Joker represents as a force of chaos. Even as a criminal and an organizer in the criminal world, he’s still chaotic which Chris Nolan tapped him to in a great way in The Dark Knight.

But without getting too much into it, their relationship is dysfunctional. It’s very accurate to the source material and that’s something that Harley has to deal with and grow and how does she empower herself? What does he mean to her? What does he mean to us? It’s all rather complex and I think rather honest how we’re dealing with it.

You said it was mostly an ensemble. Is there a character or characters that are the center that the rest revolve around?

AYER: I think it’s really Will’s movie in a lot of ways. He’s kind of built it around him and his journey. His character journey is a fantastic way to move the audience through this. Part of what I do as a filmmaker is find the film’s viewpoint and he’s a fantastic way to tell a story.

I know there’s a lot of ground to cover in this movie. One of the connections or relationships no one has really mentioned or talked about is that Deadshot’s the Batman villain. Because Deadshot was a Batman villain, he was a Batman villain before Suicide Squad. Do you touch on that in this movie?

AYER: All of the above.

Do they have scenes together?

AYER: I don’t know what I can say. They have a history.

What’s it been like adjusting to this world of secrecy for you?

AYER: I was in the Navy, I had a security clearance, so been there, done that as far as dealing with classified material. There’s mechanisms in place. Nobody gets a hard copy of the script. Everybody works online. Everything’s tracked. Everything’s coordinated. It’s a little rough just from the work-a-day sense because you can’t have a bunch of paper stacked on your desk, but at the same time, I think it’s valuable. We have had some material exposed by virtue of being out on the streets and working out on the streets, but it’s a sliver. It’s a fragment and it’s all out of context. For me it’s a lot of fun just to see how people try and assemble these pieces because in their minds, they’re a much larger piece of the film than they’re actually saying. But it takes days and days to shoot a scene so it’s how does all this fit together? That’s the big surprise.

Are you purposefully secluding Jared Leto from the rest of the cast?

AYER: Absolutely. Yeah. I think any director, for me, there’s always a bit of social engineering that happens. I treat every actor differently sort of according to their needs. With Jared, when he shows up he’s very much kept in isolation and then he shows up and you really feel the energy change. He’s scary. He’s a scary dude. He’s in character. I mean he’s knocking it out of the park. He’ll make the hair on the back of your neck stand up. What he’s doing is really powerful.

How much does the fact that Jared Leto is a literal rock star influence his take on the Joker? Because just look at some of his photos. There was the one hanging on the wall and he’s sneering and I’m like, “Oh my God. He’s Billy Idol.”

AYER: I just think it’s a sense of he understands how to drive a crowd and that there’s just something very, very real and very honest about having that ability he’s able to bring to the character. This guy isn’t an introvert. This is an extroverted Joker. This is a Joker who really puts himself out in the world and is very socially adept and uses his presence. Jared is definitely drafting on his own abilities in that regard.


http://collider.com/suicide-squad-david-ayer-interview/?

- Margot Robbie no quería decepcionar como 'Harley Quinn' (comicbook):
Margot Robbie no quería decepcionar como 'Harley Quinn'
Por Lucas Siegel 11/07/2016


When it comes to hype, rarely has there been as much around a character as there has for both Harley Quinn and The Joker in Suicide Squad. From the other actors, to the director, to production staff, and yes, even from press and fans based on small early looks, it seems like everyone in the geek, DC Comics, and film communities have already decided they'll be seeing some of the best comic book interpretations on the big screen ever. So how does someone like Margot Robbie, one half of that duo (with Jared Leto, of course), deal with that pressure? She starts by recognizing her advantage.

" fortunate that I get to be the first to [play Harley Quinn]," Robbie told Comicbook.com and select press during a set visit to Toronto last summer, "because there's nothing to like, you know, no one's set the bar frighteningly high the way they have with Joker, for example."

So while it's easier in that regard, being the first on the big screen (Harley Quinn was actually born in animation, on Batman: The Animated Series, and a more modernized, closer-to-the-film version was in an animated feature last year), Robbie also feels the pressure of the early excitement, and fan expectation.

"[I'm] acutely aware of the fact that there's a massive fan base, and you don't want to disappoint anyone. Yeah, it's terrifying," she said, "but like I said, it's nice to be able to be the first one to do it."

Luckily for Robbie, she and the rest of the cast got along famously, spending nearly all their time together during shooting, both on and off set. She also expressed her surprise and excitement for the process of her first tentpole/comicbook film, something that no doubt helped her portray the character in an ideal manner.

"I thought doing a comic book movie would be a very formulated process, and so far this has been one of the most like organic and spontaneous processes like I've been through. This is the sort of process I'd expect to do on a really cool gritty indie film, and we're doing it on in this like massive budget film where there's so many people giving their opinion on like what we're wearing, what we're doing, blah, blah, blah," Robbie revealed. "At the end of the day everyone's kind of standing back and letting David do it the way he wants to do it, and fortunately for us, the way he wants to do it is a very raw, gritty way."

Robbie also said that she'll play Harley Quinn, "I hope forever," elaborating, "until my body can't keep, isn't capable of doing the stunts anymore," so fans who enjoy this first live-action take on Harley should be happy for years to come.

Suicide Squad hits theaters August 5, 2016.


http://comicbook.com/2016/07/06/margot- ... ley-quinn/



- David Ayer dice que la cantidad de humor de la película 'sorprenderá' a los fans (screenrant):

David Ayer dice que la cantidad de humor de la película 'sorprenderá' a los fans
Por Andrew Dyce 11 julio 2016


There was a time when the greatest comic book movie to ever be released was considered by many (if not most) to be Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight. Casting off the neon, the gadgets, and instead sticking to cerebral drama, audiences of die-hard comic book fans and casual moviegoers alike all thanked Nolan for finally taking the Batman seriously. But just as the implied call for more grounded, gritty, intense, and ‘mature’ comic book movies echoed around the world, the backlash came almost immediately. With Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel (produced by Nolan) and Batman V Superman criticized for being “too serious” or “not much fun,” those entrusted with the future of the DCEU took a moment to regroup – with the Suicide Squad already barreling toward completion.

To a large part, critics and bloggers saw what they wanted to see. Rumors that David Ayer’s Suicide Squad, itself viewed as a gritty, street-level crime film were going in for reshoots had only one explanation to those who believed Warner Bros.’ leadership was scrambling: the reshoots would add more humor, more jokes, as a direct reaction to the BvS criticism. While David Ayer came out and dismissed that rumor immediately, we couldn’t yet share what we learned on the set of Suicide Squad, having asked Ayer how he saw his film compared to the “serious” tone the DCEU was establishing, with so much oddball humor already evident.

It’s not an easy question to ask a writer or director while filming, since any behind-the-scenes Blu-ray featurette or director commentary usually reveals that some of a movie’s funniest moments are unscripted or chance. But when we asked Ayer if his tale of screwball supervillains was going to be as dark as the first trailer implied (with the most unnerving take on the Joker yet), his response went far, far deeper than classifying his particular story or cast as “serious” or “funny”:

“It’s both. I think it’s both. Drama – you know, the Greek symbol for drama is happy mask, sad mask. If you have too much of one, it’s imbalanced. And I think the best movies are the ones that can make you double over in laughter and cry. Which I hope this will do for the audience. I think people will be really surprised by how much humor is in the movie. But at the same time, it’s honest, situational, character-based humor versus like, the low hanging fruit, You know? You really believe it, it’s really germane to these characters.”

Although his description of the movie’s tone can’t convey the impression of energy, attitude or personality of the finished film (or at least the one that’s been so successfully marketed to this point), it’s a much-needed reminder that those referring to the budding DCEU as “too serious” aren’t hitting the real issue. Fans can get behind a serious story, with serious issues (we sincerely, hope) if executed to their liking. But if it lacks the balance Ayer is pursuing, the wear and tear star to show.

It works in either direction, too. Frankly, the claim by some that the upcoming Justice League movie will be moving things in the right direction by “adding more jokes” could be just as worrying – unless there were critics who actually longed for “more jokes” instead of a more compelling story or character work. But as the first writer and director not connected to a Zack Snyder film who will be placing a new brick in the foundations of the DC Extended Universe, the launch of Suicide Squad could completely change the game. After all, when it’s released, people may realize that “a DC movie” and “a Zack Snyder movie” are no longer synonymous.

Going by the impressions on set, the grim tone of Snyder’s films may just be a sign of the filmmaker-driven approach being followed by WB, in that it was simply Snyder’s way of telling the story he had to tell (by comparison, the producers believe the next chapter was always going to change the structure). That doesn’t fall to other creators, and perhaps most surprisingly, the mind behind stories like Training Day, Harsh Times, Sabotage and Fury already knew that his film wouldn’t be what people expected before production had even wrapped.

And while Ayer may not praise his own writing, his producers Richard Suckle and Andy Horwitz felt the comedy would be a surprising feature for most audiences:

Richard Suckle: The movie has a fantastic sense of humor, all the while being serious when it needs to be serious. It delivers on the action, but the sense of humor is something that I found… It really went well in the script, but now you see it on camera. It’s a great cocktail, I guess, is the way to describe it. In order to have outrageous characters, I think they have to be able to say outrageous things. I always find films, whether they be comic book movies or not, when you have a serious situation it really accentuates the drama and the tension when you can offset it with a joke, if that joke fits within the tone and the context of the movie. It happened naturally. You look at a movie like Man of Steel, of course it’s going to have its dramatic qualities and a seriousness, but this film really actually does allow for there to be a sense of humor.

Andy Horwitz: Look at the characters that are all together. I think just organically, the comedy just comes out of these people being together and having such different temperaments and different attitudes and different outlooks on life… It’s amazing how the delivery of lines and how much fun they’re having. And David, of course, is coming up with things on set, and throwing lines at them. Everyone laughs about it, and of course will probably be some of the funnier stuff in the movie, at the end of the day.

If you still have doubts, David Ayer delivers the one summary that may be most surprising:

“I think that it’s going to be a lot more accessible than people think. I really believe that. And I’ve got kids, I want my kids to see this.”

If that isn’t a relief – albeit a little surprising, given the conversation surrounding an R-Rating in recent months – then we don’t know what is. Still, we might recommend parents see what thrills Joker has in store before taking their children… just to be safe.

Are you relieved to hear that the Suicide Squad will be funnier, and more accessible than Ayer’s track record of hard-hitting street stories might imply? Or are you disappointed that the story won’t be as dark, violent, or “mature” as you had hoped?


http://screenrant.com/suicide-squad-movie-humor-rating/



- Margot Robbie sobre el entender a Harley Quinn, el romper a Joker, y luchar con tacones (collider):

Margot Robbie sobre el entender a Harley Quinn, el romper a Joker, y luchar con tacones
Por Adam Chitwood 11 Julio, 2016


From the moment we learned that Margot Robbie would be playing Harley Quinn in Suicide Squad, it was perfect casting. The fresh-faced actress was coming off a star-making turn in Martin Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street, in which she more than proved her dramatic chops, but she also proved her range in the romantic caper Focus, in which she starred opposite her eventual Suicide Squad co-star Will Smith. Now, with a month to go before writer/director David Ayer’s villain-centric film hits theaters, Robbie is consistently the standout in any and all trailers, and there’s already word that she’s spearheading a female-centric DC Extended Universe spinoff film with Quinn and various other characters.

But let’s go back to the beginning. Last summer, I was invited to visit the Toronto set of Suicide Squad along with a small group of reporters. While the scene we were supposed to see be shot was rained out, Robbie graciously agreed to stick around and speak to us about the film and her experience thus far. The actress discussed the daunting prospect of taking on such an iconic character, where she turned to for research, the intensely personal rehearsal process, her training regimen, and the difficulty of doing everything everyone else does while wearing heels.

Robbie, of course, also talked about Quinn’s relationship with The Joker, how she was able to make sense of it in her head, and the experience of working opposite Jared Leto as a method actor. It’s a fascinating deep-dive interview that I do think you’ll find engaging. Take a look below.

Question: How exciting and daunting was it to take on such an iconic character?

MARGOT ROBBIE: Very daunting, for sure. Fortunately, everything kinda moved at such a quick pace and I was working on some other projects at the time, that I didn’t have as much time to think about it. Which I think was definitely a blessing in disguise. And since then, we’ve kind of been straight-training and stuff, and it all just moved kind of quickly that we got here before we realized it. Definitely I’ve had a lot of moments of panic, where I’m like ‘Oh God, they’re gonna hate it.’ And there’s just so many people to please, and you can’t ever really make everyone happy. So, do as much research as possible. Put as much of myself into the role as possible. As long as I do my absolute best and prepare as much as I physically can, hopefully, hopefully people are happy.

There are so many iterations of the character from the comic books when it was first introduced, to the cartoon—more recently she’s been, like, in the Suicide Squad comics. Did you get a stack of comics to read for research?

ROBBIE: Yeah, well, I got the role right before Christmas, so my Christmas list consisted of Harley Quinn comics, Suicide Squad comics, any comics that, like, incorporate Harley Quinn. So yeah, I have a massive stack.

Did Geoff Johns recommend some stuff, or did you kinda find your own?

ROBBIE: No, I just did my own and whatever my family gave me for Christmas, really.

Can you talk about the expanding role of female superheroes, or anti heroes in your case, and how Harley Quinn fits into that?

ROBBIE: I don’t think it’s any secret that the industry is definitely gravitating towards female leads and giving the women a voice. And I think they’ve finally realized that women go to see movies as much as men do. Ticket sales are coming from them as well, so why not appeal to them? I think they’re finding a way…I think the superhero platform gives the female character, you know, a relate-ability for the male audience as well. So, I think that’s why people are kinda gravitating towards female super hero characters, and also female characters in general as big parts of the film. So, that’s great for us, female actors who want to do roles like that, which is really great. But um, Harley in particular, like you said earlier, she’s like a very—she has an endearing quality even though she is technically one of the bad guys I was kinda searching online trying to figure out why that was, that even though…you know, how do you make someone likable when they’re doing horrible things? Definitely her soft spot for Joker seems to be something people relate to and empathize with. And it makes her more real. And I think, also the fact—not just for Harley, but all the characters—because they are so flawed, I think it makes them very accessible for an audience, and I think the fact that they are super villains kind of makes them a little more exciting, and like I said, accessible. So yeah, I think you definitely don’t need to be a good guy to win the audience over.

We were just talking about the six weeks of training that you guys had to do. Was this the most intense amount of training you had to do for a role?

ROBBIE: I started training in November last year, so it was more like six months for me. But, uh, yeah, definitely by far the most training regime I’ve ever gone through.

Specifically for this role, you were training since November?

ROBBIE: Yeah.

What was the hardest part for you? We heard that you’re dancing, you’re fighting…

ROBBIE: Yeah, I mean, ironically enough, it’s the more simple things that prove to be the most difficult Like I can technically learn…you know, I started doing gymnastics, I started doing gun training and this and that. I can understand the technical side of how to do something. Oh, that’s how you can do a forward walk over or a hand stand for thirty seconds? But I didn’t have the physical strength to allow myself to do those things. Even the gun training. If I’ve done gymnastics for an hour and a half and I go straight to the gun range and I’m holding a revolver in my left hand just in case I need to shoot with two hands, my hands are like shaking like this because my muscles are just so sore. And just not strong enough to deal with that, but you have to be able to do that because on set, you know, if you’ve got a close up shot of the gun in the foreground of the frame and it’s shaking like this, you think, ‘Harley doesn’t know that she’s doing. She doesn’t look scary right now. She’s definitely going to miss this shot.’ So ironically enough, it was the more simple things that I had trouble with.

Can you talk about the psychological complexity of the relationship between her and Joker, and what she basically goes over to the dark side for? What is it about him? Can you talk a little bit about the sort of Sid and Nancy thing that comes up?

ROBBIE: Yeah, I spent a lot of time trying to figure out their relationship because it’s so easy…it’s kinda like when your friend is in, like doing something stupid in a relationship, and you’re just so frustrated. You’re like, what are you doing? Why are you doing that? So it kinda feels like that when you watch it, when you’re reading comics and Harley goes back to him. And you’re just so frustrated, what are you doing? So I was like, this is really important that I understand, and I want to do the things that she does. I need to really feel like that’s how I would react in a situation. I ended up landing upon codependency as the tact to take with that. And it turns out it’s far more…It’s like a compulsion, I suppose. It’s kinda when you start looking at it the way an alcoholic is compelled, you know, needs to have a drink. When you think of it in those terms, like it’s an actual psychological problem, which codependency actually is, in really severe cases of codependency. So the more research I did, the more it made sense for me to behave the way she behaved.

The producers compared Harley to Hannibal Lecter where her power of words can mess up anybody. What does that involve for you in terms of how you speak or how you get into someone’s head?

ROBBIE: Yeah, yeah, that actually I found really difficult because I find myself in real life, if there’s ever tension, I try to diffuse the tension. And that’s just a natural reaction for me. Where for Harley it’s the complete opposite. And David’s really, our director’s really encouraged me to hone in on that aspect of her, because it’s something that doesn’t come to me naturally. Or most people who wanna, like, not be involved in confrontation. But she feeds off that, so any opportunity in the rehearsal process where we did lots of improvising and stuff that’s not even in the script but you end up delving into quite deep places. And you’re pretty aware that whoever’s doing that scene at the time, you know the costars I’m working with, they’re kinda feeding off real things, so my natural reaction is to kinda like, leave it be or talk over it, so that we don’t have to…but that’s not what Harley would do. If Harley saw that they’ve shown a weak spot, she would like a little scorpion tail just like *psst*, get in there. And I felt so awful and so many times we did, like, these scenes and I was just saying awful things. And seeing that someone’s struggling with something in particular, and David’s looking at me like, ‘you better get in there, that’s your window of opportunity right there, take it.’ It feels really awful sometimes.

She was a shrink though, too. Did you study any of those tactics?

ROBBIE: Yeah, I kinda wanted, funnily enough. I mean, yes I had to like look into that side of things, which I did and I’m just learning the basics of that and different mental illnesses, and how you recognize them or whatever. But where it became most useful is we started doing rehearsals with Jared Leto who plays Joker, and he’s a method actor. So he’s in character all the time. Because he’s got his facade up all the time, it was really hard for me to get through to him at first, I felt. So I was like, ok I really gotta take this you know, as if, I am trying to crack the Joker. And ended up looking into the MMPI testings they have. It’s kinda like a test that psychologists use to determine what mental illness people might have. It’s kinda like a list of 500 questions or something, I spent a lot of time reading those, and then whenever we had time to rehearse or improvise, or even in the scenes, I’d just start with those questions. Some of them are basic, and some of them are not. See which ones would catch him off guard, see how he’d react, and I’d be like, ok I’m gonna go for this tact now. It’s a lot of trial and error, but yeah, it was definitely interesting to do that side of things.

Can you tell us a little about the costume and the hair, and how you feel when you’re done up as Harley? And is there a part of it that you love the most, and on the flip side a part of it that you kinda hate?

ROBBIE: Funnily enough the things that I love the most go very much hand in hand with the things I hate the most, as well, because it looks so amazing when your skin’s completely white and you’ve got tattoos and the wig’s crazy, annnnnnd it takes three hours to do. So I hate that I have to…but having said that, without all that hair and makeup, I wouldn’t feel like the character at all. When I am all done up I don’t look anything like myself, and I start behaving very differently, and it kinda does a lot of the work for you, I guess, with the whole getting into character side of things.

Talking about costume, in the art they released, Harley is wearing stiletto gym shoes. Did you get to push back on that at all, like can I wear some real shoes if I’m gonna be running around?

ROBBIE: Yeah, when the process started—

Twist an ankle?

ROBBIE: Oh trust me, there was a…yes, and anytime anyone on set complains like, ‘this is really hard, I’m getting tired,” I’m like “everything you’re doing, I’m doing in stilettos, ok? I’m doing as much as you, all these stairs we’re walking up, I’m doing it in heels.” Yeah, no, to begin with we were looking at wearing docs and flat shoes, and then we did the camera tests, and I think was pretty unanimous, that like “you’ll be a lot better looking if you’ve got a bit height.” So, that’s when the powers that be stepped in and voted on a pair of heels. And then once I knew that it had to be a pair of heels, I was like right, well I want the most badass looking ones. And when I saw the Adidas ones I was like, they are siiiick. It all happened quite quickly, and before I knew it I was like, “ok yeah, so that’s the costume.” And I walked around in them for a day and I was like, that was the worst idea. Ever.

We’ve heard the actors have been really integral to developing the characters with David when you first signed on. How did the character evolve once you signed on and had input and you guys talked through the character? How different is it now that that first iteration that was in the script?

ROBBIE: Yeah, that’s a good question. Like I said, I had done as much research as I possibly could. I mean, I’m still reading comics as we go. It’s really hard to read all of them. But I guess it just takes it to a much deeper level, and he finds parts in you that relate to the character. Which is something that you think you’re doing when you do your prep. But then you start working with someone like David and realize that you haven’t done that at all. And like subconsciously you were just using your top layers, because you don’t want to go to the deeper layers cause that’s, you know, terrifying, and you definitely don’t want to expose that in front of people that you don’t know. But day one we’re in the rehearsal room in front of everyone I’d just met and David’s like, so tell me about your childhood. It’s immediately in deep and you’re completely exposed and it’s kinda awful but ends up being extremely helpful for the character work and development.

How wild are the scenes between you and the Joker? How would you characterize them?

ROBBIE: Pretty wild. Crazy. I’ve never seen scenes like it before, personally. It’s next level. People better brace themselves. It’s weird, they’re a fascinating couple. Honestly, I find their stuff the most exciting out of everything. I’d watch a dialogue scene between them over, like, buildings blowing up and guns, which I love that stuff as well. But when they are just—or when they find someone that they wanna pick on, it’s scary. Yeah, they’re messed up.

With her being so attached to the Joker how does she interact with the rest of the Squad? What is her relationship with them and how does she fit in amongst them, being so completely enamored with the Joker all the time?

ROBBIE: Yeah, fortunately, I mean I was kinda banking on the fact that when Harley isn’t around Joker she’s slightly less crazy than she is when she is with him. Only because there’s a lot of plot points you need to get across, and there’s a whole lot other list of characters that have their story lines and stuff. And I find acting 1000 percent crazy all the time it’s just totally gonna distract from what we need to be focusing on in that particular scene. When it’s a Joker scene, she’s pretty nuts because he brings that out in her for sure. And when it’s the rest of the Squad’s scenes, yeah she has her moments for sure. But she’s a little, I wouldn’t say sensible, she’s never sensible. But she’s a little more focused, I suppose.

You said you went back and read some of her stuff to prep. Was there are particular story arc that you related to, a particular run that you liked the most?

ROBBIE: I was obviously really interested in all the parts of how she became Harley Quinn and how she ended up at Arkham, and why she wanted to be there. And then I couldn’t really find too much more on…you know, you find bits and pieces, but with the comic books a lot of things, like some coincide, and some are completely different versions and it gets a little confusing. So you kinda have to make up, and decide, Oh I’m gonna go with this version, or whatever. Yeah, so there wasn’t…I mean, there are lots of little stories like oh I found that really fun. I always like her romantic story lines because I’m a girl and I can’t help it. But the things that I found most interesting were the parts where she had her big initial conversations with Joker and there’s a couple bits throughout the comics where you do flashbacks and you see their first conversations and what they talked about and why. Because I just wanted to understand why was she attracted to him why does she love him?

We see the Joker in the fetal position surrounded by all these weapons with Harley looking over him. Have you shot that scene already?

ROBBIE: No we haven’t. I saw that too and I was like, ugh, I hope they do it like that.

Is that in Arkham, is that an early kinda scene, you think?

ROBBIE: Um, no it’s not in Arkham, but it is a flashback scene.



http://collider.com/suicide-squad-margo ... interview/?



- David Ayer alaba al Joker de Jared Leto (comicbook):

David Ayer alaba al Joker de Jared Leto
Por Jay Jayson 11/07/2016


For a long time after Tim Burton's Batman (1989) came out, some people doubted that anyone would top Jack Nicholson's performance as The Joker. Then along came, Heath Ledger, whose brilliant performance as The Clown Prince of Crime in Christopher Nolan's The Dark Knight (2008) quieted the numerous doubters and earned him a posthumous Oscar. Now it's Jared Leto's time to shine as Mr. J.

"When you have someone as talented as Jared, I think when you just accept that Heath [Ledger] happened, [The] Dark Knight happened and you just move forward. It's the oldest, one of the most well known villains in modern culture," director David Ayer told ComicBook.com and other press at a Suicide Squad set visit. "To leave him fallow, I think would be a shame. We instantly know who he is. We know how he makes us feel, we know how he's going to behave. Just one little drawn picture of him and a character that fantastically iconic and powerful almost emerges himself. Once you start touching that character and playing with that character he really does reveal himself in a lot of ways. He's so defined. Jared has done nothing short of just utterly transforming himself and has done an incredible amount of work. The mannerisms, his voice, everything. When he steps on set you feel it, you feel the energy, the crew feels it. It's going to be I believe nothing short of revelation."

Ayer also touched upon Leto's method approach for the part. "He's in character and when he shows up here he's in character," he explained. "He's in his trailer, he's in character. He emails me, he's in character. Like, whoa. He's a little f--king scary. It will be nice to see Jared again."

The director says the cast delved deep into researching their characters, reading whatever they could and observing their real-world equivalents. He only teased how deep Leto went with his research. "Everybody got really deep into their work. Jared, once all is said and done, I think it will just be fantastic to share the work he's done and the layers and research," he teased. "He's one of the first guys I worked with and cast in this. Everybody has done their real-world work. Again, because we all want these characters to feel as realistic as possible, which is what we are doing a little bit different here."

It feels good to be bad… Assemble a team of the world’s most dangerous, incarcerated Super Villains, provide them with the most powerful arsenal at the government’s disposal, and send them off on a mission to defeat an enigmatic, insuperable entity. U.S. intelligence officer Amanda Waller has determined only a secretly convened group of disparate, despicable individuals with next to nothing to lose will do. However, once they realize they weren’t picked to succeed but chosen for their patent culpability when they inevitably fail, will the Suicide Squad resolve to die trying, or decide it’s every man for himself?

Written and directed by David Ayer based on the characters from DC Comics, the film stars Will Smith (“Ali”), Jared Leto (“Dallas Buyers Club”), Margot Robbie (“The Wolf of Wall Street”), Joel Kinnaman (“RoboCop”) and Viola Davis (“The Help”). The cast also includes Jai Courtney (“Insurgent”), Jay Hernandez (“Takers”), Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje (“Thor: The Dark World”), Ike Barinholtz (“Neighbors”), Scott Eastwood (“Fury”), Cara Delevingne (“Paper Towns”), Adam Beach (“Cowboys & Aliens”), and Karen Fukuhara in her feature film debut. It is produced by Charles Roven and Richard Suckle, with Zack Snyder, Deborah Snyder, Colin Wilson and Geoff Johns serving as executive producers.


http://comicbook.com/dc/2016/07/10/davi ... tos-joker/



- Margot Robbie y la diseñadora de vestuario Kate Hawley sobre el amor loco de Harley Quinn y Joker (IGN):

Margot Robbie y la diseñadora de vestuario Kate Hawley sobre el amor loco de Harley Quinn y Joker
Por Jim Vejvoda 11 Julio 2016


"Look, I'm seeing it through Harley's eyes, and I go, 'F**k, what's wrong with wanting to f**k the Joker?,'" said costume designer Kate Hawley during a press visit to the Toronto set of Suicide Squad last summer. "I think, why can't it be like that? It should be like that."

In order to bring these DC Comics icons to life in the upcoming film, Hawley and her fellow artisans explored what makes them tick, particularly the psychological and sexual elements of the mad love between the "amazing, charismatic" Joker (played by Jared Leto) and Squad member Harley Quinn (portrayed by Margot Robbie).

The David Ayer-directed movie includes flashbacks that chronicle how psychiatrist Dr. Harleen Quinzel fell for her Arkham Asylum patient, the Joker, culminating in her chemical bath transformation into his pale-skinned love interest and cohort-in-crime, a sequence Hawley dubbed Harley's "Chemical Wedding" to the Joker.

"Everyone loves the naughty boy, and there's got to be some pathos and sympathy somewhere, because all those characters have a complexity," said Hawley.

She likened the relationship between the Clown Prince of Crime and his shrink-turned-girlfriend to the dangerously dysfunctional romances depicted in Natural Born Killers and Sid & Nancy: "They can't bear to be apart. They can't bear to be together. It's a symbiotic relationship."

Hawley finds the "interesting thing about them is almost both like alpha males in this relationship, and her part, I have to say, has been so beautifully written. She's got some of the best lines. You know, they're divided between seven of the Suicide Squad on that, but she very much comes across as a woman that can make her own choices and things like that -- because we've been very conscious as being a traditionally more female-dominated department, how she has a voice and there's still something women respond to and like and has the power, you know?"

"'I wanna f**k who I want when I want. I'm all under control.' In fact, the kind of line that we first started out with was, 'People like you need to f**k people like me,'" said Hawley.

Hawley also revealed Harley is likely responsible for some of this Joker's already infamous tattoos: "What do these people do in the morning? And if anyone can imagine a daily routine in the Joker's life that's sort of slightly weird. But we're talking about, you know, if Harley and Joker were always trashed out of their heads or whatever, and I just imagined her scribbling on him while he was out of it one night."

For her part, Harley Quinn actress Margot Robbie called DC Comics' version of Bonnie and Clyde "pretty wild," "crazy" and "messed up." As she told us during a break on set, "I've never seen scenes like it before, personally. It's next level. People better brace themselves. It's really. It's weird, they're a fascinating couple. Honestly, I find their stuff the most exciting out of everything. I'd watch a dialogue scene between them over, like, buildings blowing up and guns, which I love that stuff as well. But when they are just—or when they find someone that they wanna pick on, it's scary."

As rigorous as her six weeks of physical training was, Robbie was particularly keen on wanting to grasp the psychological nature of Harley and Joker's relationship and why Dr. Harleen Quinzel would break bad for DC's most infamous villain.

"I was obviously really interested in all the parts of how she became Harley Quinn and how she ended up at Arkham, and why she wanted to be there," said Robbie, who read through various comics in preparing for the role. "I always like her romantic story lines because I'm a girl and I can't help it. But the things that I found most interesting were the parts where she had her big initial conversations with Joker and there's a couple bits throughout the comics where you do flashbacks and you see their first conversations and what they talked about and why. Because I just wanted to understand why was she attracted to him why does she love him?"

"I spent a lot of time trying to figure out their relationship," Robbie said. "It's kinda like when your friend is in, like doing something stupid in a relationship, and you're just so frustrated. You're like, 'What are you doing? Why are you doing that?' So it kinda feels like that when you watch it, when you're reading comics and Harley goes back to him. And you're just so frustrated. 'What are you doing?'"

Robbie continued, "This is really important that I understand, and I want to do the things that she does. I need to really feel like that's how I would react in a situation. And I ended up landing upon codependency as the tact to take with that. And it turns out it's far more...It's like a compulsion, I suppose. It's kinda when you start looking at it the way an alcoholic is compelled, needs to have a drink. When you think of it in those terms, like it's an actual psychological problem, which codependency actually is, in really severe cases of codependency. So the more research I did, the more it made sense for me to behave the way she behaved."

When we chatted with the film's producers, they likened Harley Quinn to Hannibal Lecter, another shrink-turned-villain who was masterful at getting inside people's heads. Robbie found tapping into that confrontational side upsetting.

"If there's ever tension, I try to diffuse the tension. And that's just a natural reaction for me. Where for Harley it's the complete opposite," Robbie explained. "And our director's really encouraged me to hone in on that aspect of her, because it's something doesn't come to me naturally. Or most people who wanna, like, not be involved in confrontation. But she feeds off that, so any opportunity in the rehearsal process where we did lots of improvising and stuff that's not even in the script but you end up delving into quite deep places. ... If Harley saw that they've shown a weak spot, she would like a little scorpion tail just like -- psst! -- get in there. And I felt so awful and so many times we did these scenes and I was just saying awful things. And seeing that someone's struggling with something in particular, and David's looking at me like, 'You better get in there, that's your window of opportunity right there, take it.' It feels really awful sometimes."

However, adapting to that confrontational side and studying up on the psychiatric skills Harleen Quinzel would have came in handy when going toe-to-toe with the Oscar winner portraying the Clown Prince.

As Robbie recalled, "Where it became most useful is we started doing rehearsals with Jared Leto who plays Joker, and he's a Method actor. So he's in character all the time. Because he's got his facade up all the time. It was really hard for me to get through to him at first, I felt. So I was like, OK, I really gotta take this you know, as if, I am trying to crack the Joker. And ended up looking into the MMPI testings they have. It's kinda like a test that psychologists use to determine what mental illness people might have. It's kinda like a list of 500 questions or more. I spent a lot of time reading those, and then whenever we had time to rehearse or improvise, or even in the scenes, I'd just start with those questions. Some of them are basic, and some of them are not. See which ones would catch him off guard, see how he'd react, and I'd be like, OK, I'm gonna go for this tact now. It's a lot of trial and error, but yeah, it was definitely interesting to do that side of things."

Robbie also credited those who created Harley's look for the film in helping her fully inhabit the role: "Without all that hair and makeup, I wouldn't feel like the character at all. When I am all done up I don't look anything like myself, and I start behaving very differently, and it kinda does a lot of the work for you, I guess, with the whole getting into character side of things."

Fans can finally see Harley and Joker's mad love realized in live-action form when Suicide Squad hits theaters next month.


http://www.ign.com/articles/2016/07/11/ ... s-mad-love



- Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje habla sobre 'Killer Croc' (IGN):

Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje habla sobre 'Killer Croc'
Por Jim Vejvoda 11 Julio, 2016


Killer Croc is stirred from the darkness of his sewer cell at Belle Reve Penitentiary by a noise from above. A bloodied goat carcass is dropped from an opening far above into a pool of water in the cell of the half-man, half-reptilian convict. It's dinner time for Suicide Squad's Waylon Jones. And it ain't pretty.

IGN was among a select number of media outlets invited to the Toronto set back in August 2015. We spoke to Croc actor Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje out of costume roughly an hour before watching them film so it was quite a kick to see him then walk up to us in his grotesque makeup soon thereafter.

Waylon "Killer Croc" Jones is a longtime Batman foe who, as we recalled in our Suicide Squad character guide, "was born with a rare condition that gives him a rough, scaly hide. After being abused and taunted by everyone (even his own aunt), it's little surprise he grew up to become a super-criminal. When he isn't busy fighting Batman and Robin or eating human flesh, Killer Croc can usually be found in the depths of Gotham's sewers."

The actor -- known to many as Mr. Eko on Lost -- visited a crocodile preserve in the Florida Everglades to prepare for film. He also "studied a lot of video on how they kill. I was very intent on bringing the characteristics of a crocodile to him. ... Even the way I walk, I walk like I’m moving through water. So he has this sinuous twist. When I was studying and training in the mirror, I did various walks but the minute I did that the whole prosthetic came alive and took another dimension. It was very creepy, but it was very, very animalistic. So we have this kind of sinuous walk like he’s walking through water even when he’s walking on ground. All of this came from watching them, studying them."

"We’re not about just making this beast. We’re making a being," Akinnuoye-Agbaje stressed. "He’s somewhat tortured and abused from his childhood. It dictates his reactions, from him wanting to go underground. He’s always been ostracized and ridiculed for how he looks. What he’s done is embrace that. Instead of saying ‘I’m ugly’, he’s says ‘I’m beautiful’. Instead of going underground as if he’s hiding, he says ‘this is my kingdom’. He’s kind of reversed some of his childhood abuse into allowing him to become what he is, which is really the next threat to take over Gotham. That’s really what his ultimate goal is. One of the reasons is probably because obviously power, respect but people liking him. And if you don’t, you’re going to have to if he’s got power. So all of those elements play into it."

But Croc isn't all scary and murderous. He also has a creative side as indicated by cat sculptures and artwork seen in his cell. "I think it’s pretty much how he expresses himself. He’s very primal, carnal. He’s a creature. And those felines, those are his brethren. And so, if he’s making sculptures that reflect that, it may be a pet that he may have had when he was a child. Things like that," said Akinnuoye-Agbaje. "He’s very creative. Again, another aspect that you’re going to see to him, just when you think you’ve got him pegged, he does something very surprising and makes these beautiful sculpted pieces. It’s a testament to the gentle, creative side of him. David [Ayer, the director] is very much about bringing that out and juxtaposing it with the visceral, viscous, barbaric creature that he has to be when he needs to be."


http://www.ign.com/articles/2016/07/11/ ... iller-croc



- Os enamoraréis de Killer Croc, Promete la estrella del "Suicide Squad'" (CBM):

Os enamoraréis de Killer Croc, Promete la estrella del "Suicide Squad'"
Por Bryan Cairns 11 Julio, 2016

Killer Croc may be a sewer-dwelling loner with a taste for human flesh, but Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje insists that beneath his scaly exterior, “Suicide Squad’s” resident reptilian cannibal only wants to be loved.

“There are some beautiful moments in the movie -- tender moments, and unpredictable moments, and gentle moments, humorous moments,” he shared with a small group of journalists, including CBR News, on the Toronto set of director David Ayer’s film. “And those are all whispers of who he was as Waylon Jones.”

Best known for his roles in “The Bourne Identity,” “Lost” and “Oz,” Akinnuoye-Agbaje also discussed the arduous makeup and prosthetic process, and researching alligators and real-life cannibals to prepare for what he describes as one of the most challenging roles of his career.

Talk about the makeup process. Did you know what you were going to get into with that?

Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje: To answer your question first, no, I didn't. It was a huge leap of faith. Obviously, David Ayer, Warner Bros., "Suicide Squad" -- the whole package was very attractive. After having a few conversations with David about what he wanted to do, and how real-based he wanted to make it, I was excited for that.

But literally did I know what? Absolutely not. I didn't actually read the script until we signed on. That was the process. But what is that process? The process is very, very interesting and arduous. First of all, I have probably one of the most amazing prosthetic teams in the business, Chris Nelson and the guys in LA. They've created, as you'll see today, the most amazing prosthetic lifeform in the form of Killer Croc.

What that does for me, it just enables me to really bring him to life. I mean I've done this before, but never to this degree. The detail, the proportions, how real I can make it -- it literally follows every crease on my face. But the actual process of getting into it, putting it on? On some days, when I'm just doing head and shoulders and the hands, it's about three hours. But there will be the last section of the movie where I'm going to be fully body. That's going to be about five, six hours.

Have you found a way to perform through it, to have your face, your emotions come through that plastic prosthetic?

It was a very real concern of mine when first approached about the project. I said to David, "Am I going to be recognizable?" He said, "Absolutely yes." I think, for me, the challenge was, and still is, is to really displace the fact that I am wearing prosthetics for the audience, and really have the audience relate to the soul of this creature or hybrid, this creature/man. That's my challenge. That's what both me and David were aiming for -- the soul of this creature -- and not rely on prosthetics.

To that end, as I've said, I've been helped with the amazing look at it, because it feels very real. It's literally glued onto my face. So, every movement, I played around with it quite a bit in the mirror before I went to camera. I tried to get the right motions. So that was really important.

One of the decisions that the director and I both agreed on was the non-use of contact lenses because it allows the viewer to really -- you know, with the eyes being the window of the soul -- it really allows them to connect with him, especially Croc or Waylon Jones, who he formerly was, with that part of him, that human part of him. And you feel this human trapped in this creature's body.

So not having, initially, the contacts. Now, what they do with them later, I don't know, but that was our initial talks. But not having that was very important for you to be able to connect with the soul of the creature. That's my challenge, is to make him as real as possible. Both David and I, we talked extensively about the look. Obviously, there is a huge backlog of history and story of how he looks. But this was the first reincarnation of him in film. And David was very insistent on making it very real.

The color, you'll notice, is my own skin tone, so that you can see the graduation of this disease that he has. So you'll see it meshed in with my own skin into the scales of what he later becomes, which is Killer Croc.

There were different colors and shades, but again, wanting to keep it very real and very almost like this is a man that became a croc or inhabited crocodile features. He's not a crocodile, he's a man. So we wanted to show that in as many aspects as we could, from the skin tone, to not using the lenses, and even to his attire. We talked about how he was going to be dressed and living in the sewer and underground.

But again, in the world of Gotham, this is a supervillain that was really going toe to toe with Batman and about to take over. After we really analyze and evaluate that history, it was like, "Well, he wouldn't really just be hiding simply under there depressed." He's owning that world.


http://www.comicbookresources.com/artic ... squad-star



- David Ayer explica que 'Harley Quinn' "tranciende todo":

David Ayer explica que 'Harley Quinn' "tranciende todo"
Por Kevin Melrose, 11 Julio 2016


When it came to selecting the lineup for "Suicide Squad," writer/director David Ayer had a deep bench from which to choose. After all, dozens of costumed criminals have been part of DC Comics' Task Force X over the past three decades.

"Deadshot is a no-brainer," the filmmaker explained to journalists visiting the film's Toronto set, "because he's just a core element of that team." And Boomerang was enlisted in part because he's "evil-chaotic." But what about Harley Quinn, the fan-favorite antiheroine played by Margot Robbie.

"I got Harley Quinn through the New 52 version," Ayer said, "but then I really started going, 'OK, what's this character?' Then you get absorbed in her stand-alone things and then you get into her origins and her relationship with Joker. Defining that, it's salt and pepper. You have to have one thought with the other."

But that's not to say he settled on Harley solely because of her connection to the Clown Prince of Crime.

"No, I wanted Harley. She's freaking cool," Ayer said. "She represents so many dichotomies in today's world where everything is so sensitive and you can't talk about anything or represent anything and you can't do anything. She doesn't care. She transcends everything. That's what is so fascinating about her. She's so many things, and such a powerful woman who is living life on her own terms and so honestly in the moment. And, a person who has an incredible joy in the moment. It's great to be able to work with that character. Margot is kicking her out of the park. Unbelievable. She's doing her own stunts, too. I've never seen that. Incredible."

Opening Aug. 5, "Suicide Squad" also stars Will Smith, Jared Leto, Joel Kinnaman, Viola Davis, Jai Courtney, Jay Hernandez, Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje, Ike Barinholtz, Scott Eastwood and Cara Delevingne.


http://www.comicbookresources.com/artic ... r-explains



- Por qué 'Boomerang' del "Suicide Squad" puede ser el papel estrella de Jai Courtney (screenrant):

Por qué 'Boomerang' del "Suicide Squad" puede ser el papel estrella de Jai Courtney
Por Andrew Dyce 13 Julio 2016


Making it ‘big’ in Hollywood has never been a more lucrative goal for any TV or film actor, but it’s also never been a less predictable path. Take a look at the biggest stars on the small and big screens, and you’ll see newcomers whose stars skyrocket overnight, stage actors from overseas snatching superhero roles, and middle-aged character actors made leading men or women in the right property (and with the right fan base). But just as often, actors and actresses who seem set to explode can fail to find the perfect project at the perfect time. With Suicide Squad, director David Ayer has assembled a variety of said stars for his motley crew – but one among them seems particularly poised to finally cement his place in movie fandom.

Sure, the character ‘Captain Boomerang’ may be hard to take seriously – his comic book counterpart sports a silk scarf emblazoned with boomerangs, and his weapon of choice isn’t as threatening as a blade or firearm. But once actor Jai Courtney (Terminator Genisys) was cast in the part, we knew Ayer was up to something. And from our time speaking with the cast and crew on the movie’s set, it seems that not only will Boomerang be a hit with fans, but it may be the high-profile breakout role the Aussie actor has been waiting for.

Courtney was known to fans of the cult hit Spartacus long before appearing as the villain in Jack Reacher, but a role opposite Tom Cruise is the kind of job an actor dreams of – and holding your own in not just fight scenes, but dramatic standoffs can be a one-way ticket to bigger and bolder roles. It was so with Courtney, who soon found himself cast in high-profile roles like John McClane’s son in A Good Day to Die Hard and John Connor’s father Kyle Reese in Terminator: Genisys.

Two roles that, on paper, no working actor would ever turn down. But in practice, they proved to be the kind of critical flops that have killed promising young stars before (and, to be fair, Courtney was rarely if ever cited as the main problem with either).

Despite the disappointments, and despite having performed both roles in an affected American accent, Courtney impressed David Ayer enough to become his first choice for the smart-mouthed, beer-drinking, line-crossing Captain Boomerang. And speaking with producers Richard Suckle and Andy Horwitz, they couldn’t praise Courtney’s performance enough:

Richard Suckle: A great actor and a great guy. One of the fun things about this character is that I’ve not seen every film Jai has made but I’ve probably seen most of them and I don’t think he’s ever been able to play a role that allows him to really be funny and he’s incredibly funny.

Andy: It’s funny because I think it’s the first time he’s gotten to use his real accent in a movie. And we always say this, that Jai is playing Jai in the movie. He really is. His character is very similar to how he is in real life. He’s a whole lot of fun in real life and he’s a jokester and he’s constantly stirring things up.

Watching a scene from the film being shot confirmed the producers’ claims, with Courtney’s Boomerang not just offering a hesitant one-liner or two, but eliciting laughs from the crew (who seemed to have recognized such was par for the course). Whether talking with publicists, costume designers, or his cast members, an utterance of Courtney’s name brought with it a sly smirk – in hindsight, likely the memories of punchlines and false(?) bravado being brought to mind after a few months’ shooting.

It’s not a case of an actor being squarely in his comfort zone, either: following the scene, he spoke openly about his ignorance of comic books, having neither grown up reading them, or even frequenting their billion-dollar film adaptations. Which means it wasn’t a shot at a comic book franchise or paycheck that led Courtney to sign onto the Squad – just a director who convinced him that this movie – and hopefully, this high-profile role – would be different.

When we asked Courtney whether he agreed with his producers’ descriptions, he wasn’t exactly eager to confirm the claim that a loud, aggressive, beer-drinking, foul-mouthed brawler is closer to his own personality than his previous roles. Luckily, co-star (and fellow Aussie) Margot Robbie was on hand to offer her own thoughts:

We got to hear from your producers saying ‘this is Jai just begin Jai’ for maybe the first time in your film career. Do you have a comment?

Margot Robbie: [Laughs] Do you think you’re playing yourself? Well you’re playing yourself a bit.

It was when the beer holster [on Boomerang’s belt, visible in promo photos] was pointed out, I think.

Margot Robbie: There’s a lot you can draw on…

Jai Courtney: Maybe Jai Courtney the actor is actually the character that I put on and Boomerang… I’m finally been able to unleash him. It’s probably…Yeah, no there’s definitely some truth to that.

Margot Robbie: Your accent gets just a little bit stronger when you’re acting as Boomer. Jai Courtney: Definitely. It’s funny because, yeah, I mean there’s something kind of interesting… I feel closer to this than anything else [I’ve played]. But from a sort of performance perspective, it’s more of a ‘character’ than anything I’ve had the opportunity to take on. But it‘s actually closer to myself than any other role I’ve ever played… [trails off]

Because he’s Australian, or…?

Jai Courtney: Because I’m a bogan piece of s***! [Everyone laughs]

Only time will tell if the finished product will do justice to Courtney’s “piece of s***” villain, but judging by the laughs won on set, the glimpses of punchlines and smartass one-liners in the film’s many trailers is just the tip of the iceberg. Hopefully, the same will be true of the actor’s blockbuster prospects.


http://screenrant.com/suicide-squad-jai ... boomerang/



- David Ayer explica cómo escogió sus miembros del "Suicide Squad" (screenrant):

David Ayer explica cómo escogió sus miembros del "Suicide Squad"
Por Andrew Dyce 13 Julio 2016


With characters like Batman, The Flash, and the similarly-crowded corners of the DC Universe, it really is an embarrassment of riches where the company’s villains are concerned. Director David Ayer made it known when revealing the first footage of his DCEU film that he believes DC Comics to possess the best supervillains in the comic book world – and he should know, since he’s the first director to build a big-budget blockbuster around villainous characters. More specifically: villainous characters playing the hero due to the bomb ticking inside each of their heads. A literal Suicide Squad.

And having such fertile ground from which to grow a potential DCEU franchise, it didn’t take long for fans to start spinning wild theories, rumors or friendly conversations about which villains deserved to appear on screen. The Suicide Squad is a title, not a specific roster, meaning Ayer had dozens of characters to choose from when beginning his screenplay for the film. And when we visited the set of the movie back in July 2015, we finally got to ask him how he decided on his final roster.

It really is an odd proposition for a comic book movie writer to be offered: in a genre where tentpole characters, multi-film arcs or shared universes tend to dictate some requirements (characters planned to appear that need introductions, ones popular in the comics or other media, etc.), Ayer seems to have had his pick of the litter. Of course, there are the usual suspects: Rick Flag (Joel Kinnaman), the team’s leader, Deadshot (Will Smith) the team’s… other leader, Boomerang (Jai Courtney) who shows the worst case scenario of putting villains in the field… and from there, the selection goes wide open.

When asked point blank about how he decided who made the cut and who didn’t, Ayer showed his comic book history by singling out the two most obvious choices:

“I mean Deadshot’s a no-brainer, because he’s just a core element of that team… he’s a supervillain. I mean, he’s a bad guy. They’re all bad guys, that’s the beauty of this… I think Will’s incredibly versatile and can handle any kind of role you throw at him. He’s definitely… it’s funny because none of the normal words apply. I wouldn’t say he’s the father figure of the team, because it’s like herding cats. They don’t care. But he definitely has that the leadership quality, and it’s a great character for him.

“It is a lot of fun to see how Boomerang, Captain Boomerang… who is sort of the most villainous of all these characters… it’s just been a blast creating this absolutely kinetic, out of control force of nature with Jai. You know the character paradigms: he’s like ‘Evil Chaotic.’”

For fans of the most recent New 52 incarnation of the “Suicide Squad” (who bear some interesting similarities to the movie version…) it’s no surprise to see Floyd “Deadshot” Lawton and Boomerang singled out – they’re the two men most likely to butt heads over the team’s course of action. Where Lawton wishes to get the job done, Boomerang wishes… well, absolutely anything else.

Jai Courtney’s chance to play a beer-drinking Australian bruiser is something we’re looking forward to after seeing him in action, but the rest of the cast fills out the archetypes nicely. There’s Killer Croc (Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje) to provide truly brutal muscle, Diablo (Jay Hernandez) to provide a superpower, and Slipknot (Adam Beach) to most likely prove that Amanda Waller ain’t kidding about the bombs in their heads.

And then there’s Harley Quinn. As the blue-and- red-dyed slugstress of the DC Universe (and increasingly visible mascot of the company’s sense of humor or sex appeal), she too was a no- brainer. But once Ayer began to weigh the requirements of her inclusion, he learned he couldn’t go far without running into her green-haired partner in crime:

“I got attracted to Harley through the New 52 version but then I really started going ‘Okay, what is this character’ [laughs]. And then you get absorbed into her standalone things, and you get into her origins, and her relationship with Joker is so defining that it seemed like ‘Okay, you have to have… it’s salt and pepper.’ You gotta have one with the other. I mean they go together like knife and fork.”

After delivering that unforgettable description, Ayer went on to admit that Suicide Squad is a new venture for the studio (and the genre), and the choice of who to include only got harder as the cast grew. But their future in the DCEU may not yet be known, which means casting what he calls a “family with interlocking skills that will complement everybody else’s” in this film, today.

The director made sure to give a bit of a tease, hinting that there were some characters who were considered, but ditched. But judging by the early buzz for the movie, a sequel appearance is definitely not out of the question:

“It’s crazy how many characters there are. I mean they keep killing them all, blowing their heads off. And that’s the beauty of this, too, you know no one’s safe. No matter who is in the movie, they’re not safe. Anything can happen. Yeah, I mean there’s definitely early rosters, but I think the core team was always there.”


http://screenrant.com/suicide-squad-mov ... ains-cast/



- Ayer habla sobre el legado de Ledger como THE JOKER y la versión de Jared Leto en el 'SUICIDE SQUAD' (lrmonline):

Ayer habla sobre el legado de Ledger como THE JOKER y la versión de Jared Leto en el 'SUICIDE SQUAD'
Por Mario-Francisco Robles 13 Julio 2016


Is there any other character in the comic book movie world whose performer is as analyzed as The Joker? When it comes to the Clown Prince of Crime, it seems that people love to discuss how the actor playing him is tackling the role. SUICIDE SQUAD hasn't even come out yet, and I've already seen more articles than I can count about Jared Leto and what he's bringing to his portrayal of The Joker. I guess when you're joining elite company, with so many actors who have left an indelible mark on a character, people hunger for insights on how you'll do it justice.

Of all the actors who've taken a turn playing Batman's most famous rogue, none loom larger than Heath Ledger. His work in THE DARK KNIGHT was not only magnetic, complex, nuanced, and striking; It not only accomplished a rare feat by winning an Academy Award for a comic book movie; But it also is intrinsically tied to the final days of a promising actor's life. Indeed, Ledger's sudden death before TDK even came out makes the shadow his portrayal casts over the character even bigger than when he had to answer questions like, "How do you follow Jack Nicholson?"

So the specter of taking on the role must have been fairly insurmountable. Even for an actor like Jared Leto, who just won an Oscar of his own in 2014. That's why David Ayer was asked, during a set visit, what it was like to create an all-new take on The Joker for SUICIDE SQUAD in a post-THE DARK KNIGHT world.

Here's what he told ScreenRant:

"Yeah, I mean, you want to talk about the third rail of comic book movies. You know, when you have someone as talented as Jared, and then I think when you just accept that… Heath happened. Dark Knight happened. And you just move forward. It’s one of the oldest, most well-known villains in modern culture, and to leave him fallow, I think, would be a shame.

“I don’t know how to say it, he’s so… we instantly know who he is. We know how he makes us feel. We know how he’s going to behave. Just one little drawn picture of him, and a character that fantastically iconic and powerful almost emerges himself. And once you start touching that character, and playing with that character, he really does reveal himself in a lot of ways. And he’s so defined."

Much has been made of how much Leto has immersed himself in the work of creating The Joker, and Ayer had a little more to say about what it was like to have him on the SUICIDE SQUAD set:

"Jared’s done nothing short of just utterly transforming himself and has done an incredible amount of work. The mannerisms, his voice, everything. And when he steps on set, you feel it, you feel the energy. The crew feels it. It’s going to be… I believe, nothing short of a revelation.

“He’s in character. When he shows up here, he’s in character. He’s in his trailer, he’s in character. He emails me, he’s in character, it’s like…’whoa.’ He’s a little f***ing scary to be honest. It’d be nice to see Jared again. It’s been a while."



http://lrmonline.com/news/ayer-talks-le ... cide-squad?



- El elenco del Suicide Squad alaba el ‘Control Total’ que se le ha dado a David Ayer (screenrant):

El elenco del Suicide Squad alaba el ‘Control Total’ que se le ha dado a David Ayer
Por Andrew Dyce 15 Julio 2016


There was a time when the impression of Hollywood movie studios – at least to fans – was clear: it was the writers and directors who spawned the true creativity and ‘art’ that wound up lasting decades or reshaping the medium… and the producers who beat the drum of profitability and star power. That was, until the rise of the Marvel Cinematic Universe – when producer Kevin Feige became the fans’ favorite player and ‘the man with the plan,’ meaning the writers and directors actually making the film were simply bringing the studio’s broad story to life.

Obviously that’s not an entirely accurate description, as numerous writers and directors have claimed the productions themselves felt as fun as an indie movie. But it’s the studio’s decision that rules – a fact learned by both Edgar Wright and Alan Taylor, whose visions for their films were vetoed – and considering the studio’s track record, the fans tend to argue it’s for the best.

It’s not just Marvel, since nearly every major franchise blockbuster sees rumors or reports of studio meddling at some point – which is why so many heads were turned (or eyebrows raised) when the first claims arrived that with the DC Extended Universe, Warner Bros. was favoring a “filmmaker-driven approach.” In short, let the writers and directors tell their own stories, and figure out the bigger vision/plan as they went. In the eyes of those who believe Marvel is the formula everyone else should just copy, it seems like folly. But for the cast of Suicide Squad, it’s changing their entire idea of where the comic book movie genre can go.

We had the opportunity to visit the set of director David Ayer’s unorthodox story of ‘bad vs. evil,’ sending the baddest killers and criminals of the DC Universe on a mission to do some good… or die trying. It was a refreshing premise since the project was first announced: Warner Bros. handing one of the first entries in the larger DCEU, featuring some of the most in-demand and fan-favorite characters, to the mind behind Training Day, End of Watch, and Fury. And when David Ayer took the stage at San Diego Comic-Con after three months of shooting, he made it clear that the film would carry as much attitude, as much unapologetic swagger, and as raw a style as any of his past work.

Overnight, the movie stole the spotlight from Batman V Superman (let that one sink in) and it seemed to be for one reason: Warner Bros. had found a unique talent to craft their comic into a movie, and let them loose. Since then, the claims that the studio really was giving creative control to their directors have shifted aside for juicier topics.

But when we spoke to Jai Courtney and Margot Robbie on the film’s set, they didn’t just reveal how little presence the studio ‘bigwigs’ seemed to have, but how the production was changing their opinions of what a ‘comic book film’ could be:

Jai Courtney: I don’t know if I came in with expectations. I was kind of opposed to the idea before it was ever… before this was ever conceptualized. It was David Ayer that really was the draw card, I mean that was the only reason I was interested in the first place. And I think that that and the property we’re working with has meant that it’s… I mean, I don’t really see comic book films, I didn’t grow up reading them. So I guess I’m not really sort of part of that fan [base]. It’s not the world I’m necessarily interested in as an audience member. And it’s probably changed my perspective on that a little, and I was probably guilty of having some ideas about where those sorts of films were headed. And I think what we’re doing is really exciting, and I think we’re really lucky to be a part of this one.

Margot Robbie: I thought doing a comic book movie would be a very formulated process, and so far this has been one of the most organic and spontaneous processes I’ve been through. This is the sort of process I would expect to do on a cool, gritty indie film, and we’re doing it on this massive budget film where there’s so many people giving their opinion on what we’re wearing, what we’re doing, blah blah blah… But at the end of the day, everyone’s standing back and letting David do it the way he wants to do it. And fortunately for us, the way he wants to do it is a very raw, gritty way.

Courtney is no stranger to the massive, studio-controlled franchises in recent years. Having appeared in series like Die Hard, Terminator, and Divergent, the Aussie actor has seen the methods – and results – by which a studio will hope to protect their investment, appeal to a broad audience, and find success (or failure).

It’s hard to say that Ayer has ever fit that bill: films like Harsh Times, Street Kings, End of Watch, and even Fury have never broken out into mainstream ‘blockbuster’ territory, but they were never really intended to, either. Certainly not with such adult, ugly, and violent realities the main pursuit.

But it’s worth remembering, too, that those smaller budget, less ‘broadly appealing’ films are usually the ones which find a devoted audience, or critical acclaim. On the one hand, it makes sense for major studios like Disney and Universal to seek out the directors responsible for small, intimate, yet promising character pieces, hand them a bigger budget and property and ask them to “just do the same.” But on the other, fans are now regularly confused when seeing those same directors micro-managed, or given properties or universe-launching sequels almost impossible to leave their mark upon.

Courtney has likely seen that experience firsthand, and knows why studios make the choices they do. But in this case, it’s Warner Bros. handing the reins to Ayer (and according to him, offering more reshoots to complete his vision) that may be the reason things are looking so bright for Squad:

JC: Just to elaborate on that, I think it’s unfortunate that when you deal with sort of franchise properties, you know, directors aren’t always afforded the freedom to take total control. And he has been and I think that’s what makes the difference.

MR: It makes such a difference. For sure.

JC: And changes the experience for everyone involved. It may be riskier from a studio perspective, but if they’re trusting in his vision – and he executes it well, which we have no doubt he will, it’s going to be amazing – then I think it just makes for a much more enriching experience.

There’s no guarantee that giving “total control” to a director will result in success; delivering critical flops like Batman V Superman are just as likely as hits like Guardians of the Galaxy. But as the current slate of comic book movies climbs into the dozens, there’s a case to be made that different movies may be the path best pursued, instead of a reliable, yet formulaic universe.

And considering that not only David Ayer’s vision, but the studio’s decision to respect it has converted one non-believer, and seems to have the entire cast eager to make as many sequels as they’re allowed, this “filmmaker-driven approach” may be worth the risk when all is said and done.


http://screenrant.com/suicide-squad-dir ... l-control/


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- El traje original de 'Harley Quinn' se hizo para el "Suicide Squad" (screenrant):
El traje original de 'Harley Quinn' se hizo para el "Suicide Squad"
Por Andrew Dyce 11 Julio del 2016


If we’re all being honest, it’s hard to imagine anyone being able to connect romantically (or at all) with a villain as twisted and evil as DC Comics’ poster boy for derangement: The Joker. So it’s no surprise that in the long history of the character, only one other person has been able to chip through that manic exterior… sort of. But as beloved as ‘the Joker’s girlfriend’ may be among comic book fans, Harley Quinn’s trip to live-action in Suicide Squad has meant making plenty of changes. Gone is the shrill Brooklyn accent, the comically oversized wooden mallet, and – perhaps most tragically – her classic red and black ‘Jester’ suit.

There have been several opinions raised about the new movie costume worn by Margot Robbie, with some admiring the dedication to the New 52 version of the character’s costume and color scheme, and others wondering why the classic costume would ever not be the obvious choice. Since our time visiting the set of Suicide Squad, reports and comments have been made about the attempts to adapt the Jester suit to live-action. But we’re finally able to give you the inside scoop on the costume, straight from those who made it.

While visiting the set, we were treated to a tour and breakdown of the costume department by costume designer Kate Hawley (Edge of Tomorrow). The topic of Harley’s wardrobe in the film inevitably arose, and the question of just how to go about crafting a costume for a character who creates a ‘classic’ look in virtually every incarnation.

And, no surprise, Hawley knew the one costume that was on everybody’s mind – including her own:

“The Jester suit has such an amazing, powerful quality to it. And we built it, we built that, and we actually put it on Margot and she looked amazing, and there’s a moment [in the film] where there’s an homage made to that very garment. What happens though… We say we could do the paper doll book of Harley in terms of all the facets she could present to you, there’s so many elements and depth to her character. And we built stuff for scenes that aren’t here anymore, and things like that.”

It’s hard to know if the knowledge that the filmmakers really did try to make the Jester suit (or some variation of it) work for the film makes its absence easier to swallow, or harder. But, as Hawley hinted, fans can still keep their eyes peeled for a glimpse of the suit – and it won’t be alone.

Speaking with Hawley, it was obvious that fan service and easter eggs were high priorities. And even though the details may have changed as the filming continued and editing saw even more aspects of the movie removed, fans can look forward to some meta references when Harley actually selects the costume she’ll wear for the movie’s mission:

“So there’s definitely an homage that was going to be a bigger moment, I’m not sure. Let’s wait and hold on because this film’s still filming and I’m sure it will continue for a while, and will keep changing [laughs]. They get given their mission outfits out of Belle Reve en route to this mission they’re on. And there’s a delightful scene, they’re all putting on their “murdering suits” as they call them, because when they put them on, people die. And Harley’s sitting there and you’ll see a moment where she’s pulling out all her corsets, so we quote every comic variation of her. It’s her dress-up box. And I feel sure, you know… I’m sure that Jester suit’s gonna come into it because none of us can leave it alone.”

It wasn’t just Hawley and her assistants who were eager to see the Jester suit live on, as producer Richard Suckle also admitted that despite their best efforts, the one costume fans knew to demand had to be left by the wayside – for now…

“It was almost sad to actually have to say: as much as we want her to be wearing, let’s say, the one piece suit, that it’s not really right for what we’re doing in this movie. But we designed it, and she put it on. Just going through her hair, makeup and wardrobe test was a real treat. We tried so many different things and so many different things that would be iconic that hopefully will live in other films if we’re lucky enough to make other films.”

Would we possibly see those tests on a Blu-ray?

“I don’t know. Let’s put it this way: we haven’t discussed that because that’s further downstream, but I would think that that would be something that … Look, it exists. It’s a great thing that would be able to include.”

We suppose the beggars can’t be choosers, which means fans should probably (and in fairness, most likely will) appreciate the look that they get, and hold out hope for a sequel with Margot Robbie donning the Jester suit. Considering the early buzz, rumors of a Harley spinoff, and director David Ayer implying an entire Suicide Squad universe is possible, they may not have to wait long.


http://screenrant.com/suicide-squad-mov ... it-margot/

- Cómo el Suicide Squad añade la magia al Universo de la Justice League (screenrant):
Cómo el Suicide Squad añade la magia al Universo de la Justice League
Por Andrew Dyce 11 Julio, 2016


When word first broke that, having rebooted the Batman series to great success with Christopher Nolan, Warner Bros. was looking to do the same with Superman, the skeptics showed up immediately. Claiming that there was simply no way of adding an alien superhero into the world of The Dark Knight, the doubters were right: and neither Zack Snyder nor the studio wanted to try. The answer was a brand new Man of Steel, designed with Nolan’s grounded, ‘serious’ approach in mind. Only later was it revealed that the world had been created with an entire DC Extended Universe in mind. And with aliens down, it seems the studio is moving onto the next hurdle, and it’s one that seems even higher: magic.

Even when Suicide Squad was first announced, it seemed a long shot that the supernatural/magical ‘powers’ of the team may be downgraded to keep Superman as the top dog in the DCEU. But from the first look at Enchantress, it was clear that writer/director David Ayer was going all the way with the mysticism and occult magic behind the heroine/antagonist. With apprehension or outright concern that adding magic to the DCEU may cause undesirable ripples, we had the chance to find out more about the decision to fully embrace the supernatural (and what form it will take) while visiting the movie’s set.

During our visit on set, we first had the opportunity to talk to producer Richard Suckle about the film’s cast, with the dark, brooding, unsettling image of Cara Delevingne’s Enchantress looming over the proceedings. And as we learned about her new “witch” design, it became clear that she, Diablo (Jay Hernandez), Katana (Karen Fukuhara), and the villain of the film, the mysterious ‘Adversary’ weren’t shying away from the occult at all.

As we shifted the conversation towards the scene of the Squad’s mission, the devastation wrought by the Adversary and his mysterious “Eyes,” Suckle confirmed that the strange aspects of the movie weren’t being kept a secret, just that the nature of magic in the film is something audiences will need to see play out for themselves:

“There’s magic in this movie. There’s things that are happening that are unexplainable. Some of them may be attributed to magic. Some of them may be attributed to other things. Maybe they’re scientific, but, yes, it’s not just someone coming into the city and laying waste. This obviously is clearly… Something has happened, and the Squad is sent into Midway City to try and fix a problem, but that problem is something that you learn more and more about as the movie unfolds.”

Fair enough. But that still raises the question of exactly how David Ayer intends to get people to buy into magical lore, when the movie is set in a (at least on the surface) ‘serious’ cinematic universe. That, and it’s not exactly been his field of expertise given his filmography. But Ayer is a fan of the harshest, most realistic sides of the world, telling stories of crime, order, desperation, and corruption in areas people tend not to look for them.

According to costume designer Kate Hawley, those same motivations informed the shape of Suicide Squad‘s world, including its take on magic. Stating the director’s overall message to be “chasing the real,” that also means this version of magic will be real, not “fantasy.” Later, we had the chance to hear Ayer explain it himself:

“Think of it this way: religion, mythology, magic is something that’s been through human history, throughout human history. The belief in the supernatural, belief in transformative abilities and everything. So if you look to the past, how did people understand and think of things, and even today there’s people of incredible faith who believe in miracles, and there’s a pantheon of world gods, all with these amazing inspired abilities. So all the answers are there.”

It’s encouraging to hear that Ayer has turned to human history for the mythology and power behind some of DC’s more outlandish characters (or in the case of Katana, the mystic elements of an otherwise traditional Japanese hero). After all, Kryptonian, Amazonian, and Apokoliptian history is expected to inform half of the Justice League – why can’t humans get their time in the archaeological spotlight?

It may seem like the kind of decision that millions, if not billions of dollars could depend upon for Warner Bros., since magic could – could – be the wild card that brings the house tumbling down. Again, it’s not as if the DCEU is off to a universally praised start, but that would be even more of a reason to weigh the risks.

But there wasn’t an ounce of studio pressure, or even compromise implied when discussing that decision with Richard Suckle. Apparently, the oft-mentioned “filmmaker driven approach” being followed by WB meant David Ayer’s idea led the way, based on the success and potential of making this film the best it could be, not thinking of what lay ahead:

“I don’t think it was a hard choice. It was just, once we decided, and David felt that the Enchantress should be part of the movie, part and parcel of having that character meant you’re embracing what comes along with her. It just sort of naturally happened. I know I sound like a broken record saying that, but you know the fact is, magic is a part of this movie. Magic is a part of the movie because, of course, the Enchantress is in it. And David completely embraced it. And it’s something we felt hadn’t been done. At least I don’t think… it hasn’t been done in a DC movie and I can’t say I know every single Marvel film… but it was something that really just naturally evolved, and as soon as David said I want her to be a part of the movie, the qualities and the attributes and the abilities that she has come along with her.

“I don’t think it’s pressure [speaking on potential DCEU films that may follow their lead]. I think it just pushes the envelope. You know, there’s so much entertainment out there and there are so many choices beyond comic book films. You need to come up with ways that you feel that you’re giving audiences new and different things. You’re not just inventing them. They’re actually there for the taking. These characters have these abilities, they have these qualities. So to be able to cherry-pick, let’s say, and pick ones that actually can show aspects that haven’t necessarily been captured on film before, I think is really exciting. And that was really exciting to David, I know, because we discussed it.”



http://screenrant.com/suicide-squad-mov ... explained/


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Re: Película del "SUICIDE SQUAD"

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- Suicide Squad - Advance Tickets On Sale Friday [TV Spot #5]:


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Re: Película del "SUICIDE SQUAD"

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- Nuevo pósters promocionales del "Suicide Squad":

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https://twitter.com/SuicideSquadWB/stat ... 1704408064
https://twitter.com/SuicideSquadWB/stat ... 5169168385




- Concept-art de Margot Robbie como 'Harley Quinn':

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- Inquietante nueva imagen bts de Jared Leto como 'Joker' (12-07-16):

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https://www.instagram.com/p/BHx6bCVBXRH/




- Nueva imágenes bts de los actores del "Suicide Squad" (13-07-16):

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https://twitter.com/adewale/status/753084851184627712
https://twitter.com/ReelSeanMurphy/stat ... 1197731840


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Re: Película del "SUICIDE SQUAD"

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- ‘Suicide Squad’ ESPY’s "Gronk meets Harley" Promo [TVSpot #6]:
https://twitter.com/SuicideSquadWB/stat ... 3944332289


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Re: Película del "SUICIDE SQUAD"

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- SUICIDE SQUAD - Official International Trailer #3:


- SUICIDE SQUAD - Extended Trailer:

http://www.comicbookresources.com/artic ... ient-promo


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Re: Película del "SUICIDE SQUAD"

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Re: Película del "SUICIDE SQUAD"

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- Revelada la lista de canciones de la banda sonora instrumental y su portada:
suicide-squad-score.jpg
La Warner Bros. ya ha anunciado que el "Suicide Squad" tendrá una banda sonora que contará con algunos de los artistas más grandes de la industria de la música, pero ahora se ha recelado la lista completa de pistas de la banda sonora instrumental que aparecerá en la película.

Film Music Reporter tiene los detalles y dice que la banda sonora de Steven Price estará disponible digitalmente el 05 de Agosto, el mismo día que se estrena la película. También estará disponible el CD el 12 de Agosto.


La lista completa es la siguiente:

01. Task Force X
02. Arkham Asylum
03. I’m Going To Figure This Out
04. You Make My Teeth Hurt
05. I Want To Assemble A Task Force
06. Brother Our Time Has Come
07. A Serial Killer Who Takes Credit Cards
08. A Killer App
09 That’s How I Cut and Run
10. We Got A Job To Do
11. You Die We Die
12. Harley And Joker
13. This Bird Is Baked
14. Hey Craziness
15. You Need A Miracle
16. Diablo’s Story
17. The Squad
18. Are We Friends Or Are We Foes?
19. She’s Behind You
20. One Bullet Is All I Need
21. I Thought I’d Killed You
22. The Worst Of The Worst
23. June Moone (Bonus Track)
24. Did That Tickle (Bonus Track)
25. You Know the Rules Hotness (Bonus Track)
26. Enchantress in the War Room (Bonus Track)
27. Introducing Diablo and Croc (Bonus Track)
28 Task Force X Activated (Bonus Track)
29. Can Everyone See This Trippy Stuff (Bonus Track)
30. I Promised My Friends (Bonus Track)




Podéis encontrar la lista de canciones cantadas de la BSO: AQUÍ


filmmusicreporter.com/2016/07/16/suicide-squad-score-album-details/
http://www.comicbookmovie.com/suicide_s ... or-a143528


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Re: Película del "SUICIDE SQUAD"

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- Suicide Squad - "Puppet Masters" Promo [HD]:


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Re: Película del "SUICIDE SQUAD"

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- Suicide Squad - Deadshot EXCLUSIVE Clip:
https://twitter.com/Machinima/status/755447130056036352


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Re: Película del "SUICIDE SQUAD"

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- SUICIDE SQUAD - Official Final Trailer (2016):


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